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  developing economies according to the IMF
  developing economies out of scope of the IMF
  graduated to developed economy

A developing country, also called a less developed country or underdeveloped country, is a nation with an underdeveloped industrial base, and a low Human Development Index (HDI) relative to other countries.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> On the other hand, since the late 1990s developing countries tended to demonstrate higher growth rates than the developed ones.<ref>Korotayev A., Zinkina J. On the structure of the present-day convergence. Campus-Wide Information Systems. Vol. 31 No. 2/3, 2014, pp. 139-152</ref> There is no universal, agreed-upon criterion for what makes a country developing versus developed and which countries fit these two categories,<ref name="UN" /> although there are general reference points such as a nation's GDP per capita compared to other nations. Also, the general term less-developed country should not be confused with the specific least developed country.

There is criticism of the use of the term developing country. The term implies inferiority of a developing country or undeveloped country compared to a developed country, which many countries dislike. It assumes a desire to develop along the traditional Western model of economic development which a few countries, such as Cuba and Bhutan, choose not to follow.<ref name="Karma Ura">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> An alternative measurement that has been suggested is that of gross national happiness, measuring the actual satisfaction of people as opposed to how industrialised a country is.

Countries with more advanced economies than other developing nations but that have not yet demonstrated signs of a developed country, are often categorized under the term newly industrialized countries.<ref name="Globalization">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref><ref name="Limits">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref><ref name="AIA">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref><ref name="Principles">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref>

According to authors such as Walt Whitman Rostow, Third World countries are in transition from traditional lifestyles towards the modern lifestyle which began in the Industrial Revolution in the 18th and 19th centuries.


Developing country sections
Intro  Definition  Measure and concept of development  Growth of developing countries  Factors stimulating growth  Factors hindering growth  Prevention of negative factors  Typology of countries  Criticism of the term \"developing country\"  List of developing economies  List of graduated developing economies  See also  References  External links  

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  developing economies according to the IMF
  developing economies out of scope of the IMF
  graduated to developed economy

A developing country, also called a less developed country or underdeveloped country, is a nation with an underdeveloped industrial base, and a low Human Development Index (HDI) relative to other countries.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> On the other hand, since the late 1990s developing countries tended to demonstrate higher growth rates than the developed ones.<ref>Korotayev A., Zinkina J. On the structure of the present-day convergence. Campus-Wide Information Systems. Vol. 31 No. 2/3, 2014, pp. 139-152</ref> There is no universal, agreed-upon criterion for what makes a country developing versus developed and which countries fit these two categories,<ref name="UN" /> although there are general reference points such as a nation's GDP per capita compared to other nations. Also, the general term less-developed country should not be confused with the specific least developed country.

There is criticism of the use of the term developing country. The term implies inferiority of a developing country or undeveloped country compared to a developed country, which many countries dislike. It assumes a desire to develop along the traditional Western model of economic development which a few countries, such as Cuba and Bhutan, choose not to follow.<ref name="Karma Ura">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> An alternative measurement that has been suggested is that of gross national happiness, measuring the actual satisfaction of people as opposed to how industrialised a country is.

Countries with more advanced economies than other developing nations but that have not yet demonstrated signs of a developed country, are often categorized under the term newly industrialized countries.<ref name="Globalization">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref><ref name="Limits">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref><ref name="AIA">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref><ref name="Principles">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref>

According to authors such as Walt Whitman Rostow, Third World countries are in transition from traditional lifestyles towards the modern lifestyle which began in the Industrial Revolution in the 18th and 19th centuries.


Developing country sections
Intro  Definition  Measure and concept of development  Growth of developing countries  Factors stimulating growth  Factors hindering growth  Prevention of negative factors  Typology of countries  Criticism of the term \"developing country\"  List of developing economies  List of graduated developing economies  See also  References  External links  

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