Actions

Sexes::Death anxiety (psychology)

::concepts

Death::anxiety    Death::langs    Anxiety::their    Which::people    About::children    Theory::often

Sexes The connection between death anxiety and the sex one belongs to appears to be strong. Studies show that females tend to have more death anxiety than males. Thorson and Powell (1984) did a study to investigate this connection, and they sampled men and women from 16 years of age to over 60. The Death Anxiety Scale showed higher mean scores for women than for men. Moreover, researchers believe that age and culture could be major influences in why women score higher on death anxiety scales than men.<ref>Harrawood, L. K., White, L. J., & Benshoff, J. J. (2008). Death Anxiety in a National Sample of United States Funeral Directors and Its Relationship with Death Exposure, Age, and Sex. Omega: Journal Of Death & Dying, 58(2), 129-146. doi:10.2190/OM.58.2.c</ref> Men were more likely to feel "noble" for dying for something or anything than women were.<ref>Harrawood, L. K., White, L. J., & Benshoff, J. J. (2008). Death Anxiety in a National Sample of United States Funeral Directors and Its Relationship with Death Exposure, Age, and Sex. Omega: Journal Of Death & Dying, 58(2), 129-146. doi:10.2190/OM.58.2.c</ref>

Through the evolutionary period, a basic method was created to deal with death anxiety and also as a means of dealing with loss.<ref>Pettigrew.Dawson."Death anexiety:State or Trait" Journal od Clinical Psychology.1979.pg158</ref> Denial is used when memories or feelings are too painful to accept and are often rejected.<ref name="Donald 1979. p85">Donald.Charles. "Death Anxiety and Mental Ability" Essence: Issues in the Study of Ageing, Dying and Death. 1979.p85</ref> By maintaining that the event never happened, rather than accepting it, allows an individual more time to work through the inevitable pain.<ref name="Donald 1979. p85"/> When a loved one dies in a family, denial is often implemented as a means to come to grips with the reality that the person is gone.<ref name="Donald 1979. p85"/> Closer families often deal with death better than when coping individually.<ref name="Donald 1979. p85"/> As society and families drift apart so does the time spent bereaving those who have died, which in turn leads to negative emotion and negativity towards death.<ref name="Donald 1979. p85"/> Women, who are the child bearers and are often the ones who look after children hold greater concerns about death due to their caring role within the family.<ref name="Langs. 2004. p43">Langs. "Death Anxiety and the Emotion-processing Mind" Psychoanalytic Psychology .2004.p43</ref> It is this common role of women that leads to greater death anxiety as it emphasize the ‘importance to live’ for her offspring.<ref name="Langs. 2004. p43"/> Although it is common knowledge that all living creatures die, many people do not accept their own mortality, preferring not to accept that death is inevitable, and that they will one day die .<ref name="Langs. 2004. p43"/>


Death anxiety (psychology) sections
Intro  Types   Theories  Children   Relationship between adult attachment and death anxiety    Sexes   Age    Measuring death anxiety   See also  References  External links  

Sexes
PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Types
<<>>