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David ({{#invoke:IPAc-en|main}}; ; ISO 259-3 Dawid; Arabic: داوُود‎{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} Dāwūd; Syriac: ܕܘܝܕ{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} Dawid; Ancient Greek: Δαυίδ{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}; Latin: Davidus{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}; Strong's: Daveed) was, according to the Books of Samuel, the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel, and according to the New Testament, an ancestor of Jesus. His life is conventionally dated to c. 1040 – 970 BCE, his reign over Judah c. 1010–970 BCE.<ref name="STIC">Carr, David M. & Conway, Colleen M., An Introduction to the Bible: Sacred Texts and Imperial Contexts, John Wiley & Sons (2010), p. 58</ref>

The Books of Samuel, 1 Kings, and 1 Chronicles are the only Old Testament sources of information on David, although the Tel Dan Stele (dated c. 850–835 BCE) contains the phrase

  1. REDIRECT (bytdwd), read as "House of David", which many scholars confirm to be a likely plausible match to the existence in the mid-9th century BCE of a Judean royal dynasty called the House of David.{{#invoke:Footnotes|sfn}}

Depicted as a valorous warrior of great renown, and a poet and musician credited for composing much of the psalms contained in the Book of Psalms, King David is widely viewed as a righteous and effective king in battle and civil justice. He is described as a man after God's own heart in 1 Samuel 13:14 and Acts 13:22.

David is an important figure to members of the Jewish, Christian, and Islamic faiths. Biblical tradition maintains the Messiah's direct descent from the line of David. In Islam, David is considered a prophet.


David sections
Intro  Biblical narrative  Historicity  Abrahamic religious traditions  Legacy  Representation in art and literature  See also  Notes  References  Further reading  External links  

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