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}} Cultural psychology is the study of how psychological and behavioral tendencies are rooted in and embodied in culture.<ref name=":0">Heine, S. J. (2011). Cultural Psychology. New York: W. W. Norton & Company.</ref> The main tenet of cultural psychology is that mind and culture are inseparable and mutually constitutive, meaning that people are shaped by their culture and their culture is also shaped by them.<ref name=":1">Fiske, A.; Kitayama, S.; Markus, H.R.; & Nisbett, R.E. (1998). The cultural matrix of social psychology. In D. Gilbert & S. Fiske & G. Lindzey (Eds.), The Handbook of Social Psychology (4th ed., pp. 915–81). San Francisco: McGraw-Hill.</ref> As Richard Shweder, one of the major proponents of the field, writes, "Cultural psychology is the study of the way cultural traditions and social practices regulate, express, and transform the human psyche, resulting less in psychic unity for humankind than in ethnic divergences in mind, self, and emotion."<ref name=":2">Shweder, Richard (1991). Thinking Through Cultures. Harvard University Press. ISBN 0-674-88415-9.</ref>


Cultural psychology sections
Intro  Relationships with other branches of psychology  Importance  Criticisms  Cultural models  Culture and Empathy  Research institutions   References   Further reading  

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