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::Conjunction (grammar)

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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Sidebar|sidebar}} In grammar, a conjunction (abbreviated CONJ or CNJ) is a part of speech that connects words, sentences, phrases, or clauses. A discourse connective is a conjunction joining sentences.{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[citation needed] }} This definition may overlap with that of other parts of speech, so what constitutes a "conjunction" must be defined for each language. In general, a conjunction is an invariable grammatical particle, and it may or may not stand between the items in a conjunction

The definition may also be extended to idiomatic phrases that behave as a unit with the same function, e.g. "as well as", "provided that".

A simple literary example of a conjunction: "the truth of nature, and the power of giving interest" (Samuel Taylor Coleridge's Biographia Literaria)<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref>

Conjunctions may be placed at the beginning of sentences.<ref>http://grammar.about.com/od/grammarfaq/f/butsentencefaq.htm</ref> But some superstition about the practice persists.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}: "[t]he idea that it is poor grammar to begin a sentence with And or But" is "nonsense baggage that so many writers lug around".</ref>


Conjunction (grammar) sections
Intro  Coordinating conjunctions   Correlative conjunctions    Subordinating conjunctions    Starting a sentence    See also    References   External links  

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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Sidebar|sidebar}} In grammar, a conjunction (abbreviated CONJ or CNJ) is a part of speech that connects words, sentences, phrases, or clauses. A discourse connective is a conjunction joining sentences.{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[citation needed] }} This definition may overlap with that of other parts of speech, so what constitutes a "conjunction" must be defined for each language. In general, a conjunction is an invariable grammatical particle, and it may or may not stand between the items in a conjunction

The definition may also be extended to idiomatic phrases that behave as a unit with the same function, e.g. "as well as", "provided that".

A simple literary example of a conjunction: "the truth of nature, and the power of giving interest" (Samuel Taylor Coleridge's Biographia Literaria)<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref>

Conjunctions may be placed at the beginning of sentences.<ref>http://grammar.about.com/od/grammarfaq/f/butsentencefaq.htm</ref> But some superstition about the practice persists.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}: "[t]he idea that it is poor grammar to begin a sentence with And or But" is "nonsense baggage that so many writers lug around".</ref>


Conjunction (grammar) sections
Intro  Coordinating conjunctions   Correlative conjunctions    Subordinating conjunctions    Starting a sentence    See also    References   External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Coordinating conjunctions
<<>>