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Example use::Conveyed concept

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Example use

Consider this:

This piece of material when introduced in a specific way introduces the child to the concept of height. Once the child understands the conveyed concept they may explore that material in a multitude of ways as long as the materials are still being handled respectfully.

This piece of material when introduced in a specific way introduces the child to the concept of height. Depending on the child's conveyed concept of height, they may explore that material in a multitude of ways as long as the materials are still being handled respectfully.

If we study the first sentence we can draw a line from material to concept of height to child and then to "the conveyed concept". Because we are depending on the child's understanding of the "concept of height" in order to continue then "the conveyed concept" is the child's understanding of that concept. The word conveyed here is used as an adjective to describe what was conveyed to the student, the concept of height, but if the child still does not understand the concept of height then it could be said the concept was poorly conveyed and that the child's conveyed concept of height was incorrect. So the conveyed concept could be what was actually presented to the child so they could understand the concept of height or conveyed concept can refer to how the child perceived what was presented. This is illustrated in Concept mapping, a technique which can be used by teachers to gauge the success rate of materials used in a student's understanding of a concept. This mapping can be specific to one student or to a group but it maps the conveyed concept of the student so a teacher can fine tune their methods in trying to convey the concept.<ref>

Attributed concept maps: fuzzy integration and fuzzy matching -[1] -</ref><ref>Concept Mapping -</ref><ref>The Role of Manipulative Materials in the Learning of Mathematical Concepts -[2]</ref> The Relevance theory can further explain how each of us can perceive what is conveyed to us in different ways.<ref>Deirdre Wilson and Dan Sperber -</ref>


Conveyed concept sections
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Example use
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