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The Proto-Celtic language, also called Common Celtic, is the reconstructed ancestor language of all the known Celtic languages. Its lexis can be confidently reconstructed on the basis of the comparative method of historical linguistics. Proto-Celtic is a branch of the Western Indo-European languages, along with the other branches Italic, Germanic, Hellenic, Indo-Iranian, Albanian and Balto-Slavic. The exact relationships between these branches are under discussion. The earliest archaeological culture that may justifiably be considered as Proto-Celtic is the Late Bronze Age Urnfield culture of Central Europe from the last quarter of the second millennium BC.<ref name=ChadCorc>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> By the Iron Age Hallstatt culture of around 800 BC, these people had become fully Celtic.<ref name=ChadCorc/>

The reconstruction of Proto-Celtic is currently being undertaken. While Continental Celtic presents much substantiation for its phonology, and some for morphology, recorded material is too scanty to allow a secure reconstruction of syntax. Although some complete sentences are recorded in Gaulish and Celtiberian, the oldest substantial Celtic literature is found in Old Irish, the earliest recorded of the Insular Celtic languages.


Proto-Celtic language sections
Intro  Sound changes from Proto-Indo-European  Phonological reconstruction  Morphology  Dating  See also  References  [[Proto-Celtic_language?section=External</a>_links|External</a> links]]  

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''-''::person    Colspan::language    Welsh::irish    Rowspan::celtic    ''makk::class    Gaulish::''ber

The Proto-Celtic language, also called Common Celtic, is the reconstructed ancestor language of all the known Celtic languages. Its lexis can be confidently reconstructed on the basis of the comparative method of historical linguistics. Proto-Celtic is a branch of the Western Indo-European languages, along with the other branches Italic, Germanic, Hellenic, Indo-Iranian, Albanian and Balto-Slavic. The exact relationships between these branches are under discussion. The earliest archaeological culture that may justifiably be considered as Proto-Celtic is the Late Bronze Age Urnfield culture of Central Europe from the last quarter of the second millennium BC.<ref name=ChadCorc>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> By the Iron Age Hallstatt culture of around 800 BC, these people had become fully Celtic.<ref name=ChadCorc/>

The reconstruction of Proto-Celtic is currently being undertaken. While Continental Celtic presents much substantiation for its phonology, and some for morphology, recorded material is too scanty to allow a secure reconstruction of syntax. Although some complete sentences are recorded in Gaulish and Celtiberian, the oldest substantial Celtic literature is found in Old Irish, the earliest recorded of the Insular Celtic languages.


Proto-Celtic language sections
Intro  Sound changes from Proto-Indo-European  Phonological reconstruction  Morphology  Dating  See also  References  [[Proto-Celtic_language?section=External</a>_links|External</a> links]]  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Sound changes from Proto-Indo-European
<<>>