::College of Sorbonne

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The College of Sorbonne in 1550
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The chapel of the Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th-century engraving
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The chapel of the Sorbonne today, from the same point of view
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Facade of the new Sorbonne building (1889).

The College of Sorbonne (French: Collège de Sorbonne{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}) was a theological college of the University of Paris, founded in 1253 by Robert de Sorbon (1201-1274), after whom it was named.<ref>De Ridder-Symoens, Hilde. [1] A History of the University in Europe: Volume 1, Universities in the Middle Ages. Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 2003: 80. ISBN 0-521-54113-1</ref> With the rest of the Paris colleges, it was suppressed during the French Revolution. It was restored in 1808 but finally closed in 1882. In recent times it came to refer to the group of academic faculties of the University of Paris, as opposed to the professional faculties of law and medicine.<ref>Dictionniare historique de Paris, Le Livre de Poche, 2013</ref> It is also used to refer to the main building of the University of Paris in the 5th arrondissement of Paris, which houses several faculties created when the University was divided up into thirteen autonomous universities in 1970.<ref>Dictionnaire historique de Paris, Le Livre de Poche. (2013).</ref>

Robert de Sorbon was the son of peasants from the village of Sorbon in the Ardennes, who had become a master of theology, a chanoine of the Cathedral of Notre Dame de Paris, and the confessor and chaplain of King Louis IX (Saint Louis). At the time that he founded his college, the University of Paris had already been in existence for half a century, and already had thousands of students. Obtaining a higher degree in theology could take as long as twenty years, and therefore required considerable financial support. Students who belonged to the religious orders of the Franciscans and Dominicans, or from the large monasteries of Cluny or Citeaux, received housing and board from their religious orders, but independent students did not. Sorbon founded his college to provide housing and board for poorer students of theology who did not have such support.<ref>Dictionniare historique de Paris, Le Livre de Poche, 2013</ref>

Sorbon purchased several houses on Rue Coupe-Gueule (now Rue de la Sorbonne) and made them into lodging for students. The college opened in 1257 with about twenty students, called socii. As the college grew, Sorbon provided a library containing over a thousand volumes by 1292, the largest in the university, and a chapel.<ref>Dictionniare historique de Paris, Le Livre de Poche, 2013</ref>

The Sorbonne became the most distinguished theological institution in France, and its doctors were frequently called upon to render opinions on important ecclesiastical and theological issues. In 1470, the Sorbonne had one of the first printing presses in France.<ref>Dictionnaire historique de Paris (2013)</ref> It was particularly active in the effort to suppress heresy and the spread of Protestant doctrines. Its students included Cardinal Richelieu, who studied there from 1606 to 1607. Richelieu became Proviseur, or administrator of the college on 29 August 1622. Between 1635 and 1642, Richelieu renovated the Sorbonne; he consolidated the Sorbonne with two smaller colleges, and built a complex of new buildings, including a domed chapel, around a large courtyard. Richelieu left a large part of his fortune and his library to the Sorbonne, and he was buried in the chapel. Only the chapel remains of the Richelieu era buildings.<ref>Sarmant, Thierry, Histoire de Paris (2012), Editions Jean-Paul Gisserot, Paris. (ISBN 978-2-755-8033-03)</ref>

The Sorbonne was closed to students in 1791 during the French Revolution. For a brief time, under Robespierre, the chapel became a Temple of Reason. Napoleon turned the college buildings into studios for artists. In 1822, it became the home of the faculties of letters, sciences and theology of the University of Paris. In 1885, as part of the Third Republic policy of separation of church and state, the theology faculty was officially closed. The old buildings of the Sorbonne, with the exception of the chapel, were demolished and the new Sorbonne building, designed by Henri Paul Nénot, opened in 1889, the centenary of the French Revolution. It contained a large amphitheater, reception halls and meeting rooms, the offices of the rector of the University of Paris, and the faculties of arts and sciences. The chapel was no longer used for religious services, but only for official ceremonies and exhibitions.<ref>Dictionnaire historique de Paris (2013)</ref>

In 1971, as a result of the riots of demonstrations of May 1968, the University of Paris was broken up into thirteen independent faculties. The New Sorbonne building became the home of the Universities of Paris I, II, III, IV, V, the École Nationale des Chartes, and the École pratique des hautes études.


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Error creating thumbnail:
The College of Sorbonne in 1550
Error creating thumbnail:
The chapel of the Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th-century engraving
Error creating thumbnail:
The chapel of the Sorbonne today, from the same point of view
Error creating thumbnail:
Facade of the new Sorbonne building (1889).

The College of Sorbonne (French: Collège de Sorbonne{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}) was a theological college of the University of Paris, founded in 1253 by Robert de Sorbon (1201-1274), after whom it was named.<ref>De Ridder-Symoens, Hilde. [1] A History of the University in Europe: Volume 1, Universities in the Middle Ages. Cambridge, U.K.: Cambridge University Press, 2003: 80. ISBN 0-521-54113-1</ref> With the rest of the Paris colleges, it was suppressed during the French Revolution. It was restored in 1808 but finally closed in 1882. In recent times it came to refer to the group of academic faculties of the University of Paris, as opposed to the professional faculties of law and medicine.<ref>Dictionniare historique de Paris, Le Livre de Poche, 2013</ref> It is also used to refer to the main building of the University of Paris in the 5th arrondissement of Paris, which houses several faculties created when the University was divided up into thirteen autonomous universities in 1970.<ref>Dictionnaire historique de Paris, Le Livre de Poche. (2013).</ref>

Robert de Sorbon was the son of peasants from the village of Sorbon in the Ardennes, who had become a master of theology, a chanoine of the Cathedral of Notre Dame de Paris, and the confessor and chaplain of King Louis IX (Saint Louis). At the time that he founded his college, the University of Paris had already been in existence for half a century, and already had thousands of students. Obtaining a higher degree in theology could take as long as twenty years, and therefore required considerable financial support. Students who belonged to the religious orders of the Franciscans and Dominicans, or from the large monasteries of Cluny or Citeaux, received housing and board from their religious orders, but independent students did not. Sorbon founded his college to provide housing and board for poorer students of theology who did not have such support.<ref>Dictionniare historique de Paris, Le Livre de Poche, 2013</ref>

Sorbon purchased several houses on Rue Coupe-Gueule (now Rue de la Sorbonne) and made them into lodging for students. The college opened in 1257 with about twenty students, called socii. As the college grew, Sorbon provided a library containing over a thousand volumes by 1292, the largest in the university, and a chapel.<ref>Dictionniare historique de Paris, Le Livre de Poche, 2013</ref>

The Sorbonne became the most distinguished theological institution in France, and its doctors were frequently called upon to render opinions on important ecclesiastical and theological issues. In 1470, the Sorbonne had one of the first printing presses in France.<ref>Dictionnaire historique de Paris (2013)</ref> It was particularly active in the effort to suppress heresy and the spread of Protestant doctrines. Its students included Cardinal Richelieu, who studied there from 1606 to 1607. Richelieu became Proviseur, or administrator of the college on 29 August 1622. Between 1635 and 1642, Richelieu renovated the Sorbonne; he consolidated the Sorbonne with two smaller colleges, and built a complex of new buildings, including a domed chapel, around a large courtyard. Richelieu left a large part of his fortune and his library to the Sorbonne, and he was buried in the chapel. Only the chapel remains of the Richelieu era buildings.<ref>Sarmant, Thierry, Histoire de Paris (2012), Editions Jean-Paul Gisserot, Paris. (ISBN 978-2-755-8033-03)</ref>

The Sorbonne was closed to students in 1791 during the French Revolution. For a brief time, under Robespierre, the chapel became a Temple of Reason. Napoleon turned the college buildings into studios for artists. In 1822, it became the home of the faculties of letters, sciences and theology of the University of Paris. In 1885, as part of the Third Republic policy of separation of church and state, the theology faculty was officially closed. The old buildings of the Sorbonne, with the exception of the chapel, were demolished and the new Sorbonne building, designed by Henri Paul Nénot, opened in 1889, the centenary of the French Revolution. It contained a large amphitheater, reception halls and meeting rooms, the offices of the rector of the University of Paris, and the faculties of arts and sciences. The chapel was no longer used for religious services, but only for official ceremonies and exhibitions.<ref>Dictionnaire historique de Paris (2013)</ref>

In 1971, as a result of the riots of demonstrations of May 1968, the University of Paris was broken up into thirteen independent faculties. The New Sorbonne building became the home of the Universities of Paris I, II, III, IV, V, the École Nationale des Chartes, and the École pratique des hautes études.


College of Sorbonne sections
Intro  Foundation  Organization  History  Accomplished students  See also  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Foundation
<<>>