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Extraterrestrial {{#invoke:main|main}} Cloud cover has been seen on most other planets in the solar system. Venus's thick clouds are composed of sulfur dioxide and appear to be almost entirely stratiform.<ref name="Bougher-127-129">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> They are arranged in three main layers at altitudes of 45 to 65 km that obscure the planet's surface and can produce virga.<ref name="Clouds in the terrestrial planets">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> No embedded cumuliform types have been identified, but broken stratocumuliform wave formations are sometimes seen in the top layer that reveal more continuous layer clouds underneath.<ref name="Mysterious waves">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> On Mars, cirrus, cirrocumulus and stratocumulus composed of water-ice have been detected mostly near the poles.<ref name="NASA-photo">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> Water-ice fogs have also been detected on this planet.<ref name="Mars-clouds">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>

Both Jupiter and Saturn have an outer cirriform cloud deck composed of ammonia,<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> an intermediate stratiform haze-cloud layer made of ammonium hydrosulfide, and an inner deck of cumulus water clouds.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> Embedded cumulonimbus are known to exist near the Great Red Spot on Jupiter.<ref name="Jupiter-clouds">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref name="Saturn-clouds">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref> The same category-types can be found covering Uranus, and Neptune, but are all composed of Methane.<ref name="Neptune's Atmosphere">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref name="Uranus-clouds">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref name="Irwin-115">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref name="Lunine 1993">{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref><ref name=elkins-tanton>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> Saturn's moon Titan has cirrus clouds believed to be composed largely of methane.<ref name="Coustenis155">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> The Cassini–Huygens Saturn mission uncovered evidence of a fluid cycle on Titan, including lakes near the poles and fluvial channels on the surface of the moon.

In October 2013, the detection of high altitude optically thick clouds in the atmosphere of Kepler-7b was announced,<ref name="MIT-20131002">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> and, in December 2013, also in the atmospheres of GJ 436 b and GJ 1214 b.<ref name="NASA-20131231">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref name="NAT-20140101a">{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref><ref name="NAT-20140101b">{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref><ref name="NAT-20140101c">{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref>


Cloud sections
Intro  Etymology   History of cloud science and nomenclature   Tropospheric clouds   Polar stratospheric clouds    Polar mesospheric clouds    Clouds throughout the homosphere    Extraterrestrial    See also    References    Bibliography    External links   

Extraterrestrial
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