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{{#invoke:Protection banner|main}} {{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Sidebar|sidebar}} {{#invoke:sidebar|sidebar | class = hlist | pretitle = Part of the nature series | title = Weather

| headingstyle = border-top:#ccc 1px solid; | heading1 = Calendar seasons | content1 =

| heading2 = Tropical seasons | content2 =

| heading3 = Storms | content3 =

| heading4 = Precipitation | content4 =

| heading5 = Topics | content5 =

| belowstyle = border-top:#ccc 1px solid; border-bottom:#ccc 1px solid; | below = Weather portal

}} Climate is the long-term pattern of weather in a particular area.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> It is measured by assessing the patterns of variation in temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind, precipitation, atmospheric particle count and other meteorological variables in a given region over long periods of time. Climate is different from weather, in that weather only describes the short-term conditions of these variables in a given region.

A region's climate is generated by the climate system, which has five components: atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere.<ref name="IPCC glossary">AR4 SYR Synthesis Report Annexes. Ipcc.ch. Retrieved on 2011-06-28.</ref>

The climate of a location is affected by its latitude, terrain, and altitude, as well as nearby water bodies and their currents. Climates can be classified according to the average and the typical ranges of different variables, most commonly temperature and precipitation. The most commonly used classification scheme was originally developed by Wladimir Köppen. The Thornthwaite system,<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> in use since 1948, incorporates evapotranspiration along with temperature and precipitation information and is used in studying animal species diversity and potential effects of climate changes. The Bergeron and Spatial Synoptic Classification systems focus on the origin of air masses that define the climate of a region.

Paleoclimatology is the study of ancient climates. Since direct observations of climate are not available before the 19th century, paleoclimates are inferred from proxy variables that include non-biotic evidence such as sediments found in lake beds and ice cores, and biotic evidence such as tree rings and coral. Climate models are mathematical models of past, present and future climates. Climate change may occur over long and short timescales from a variety of factors; recent warming is discussed in global warming.


Climate sections
Intro  Definition  Climate classification  Record  Climate change  See also  References  Further reading  External links  

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{{#invoke:Protection banner|main}} {{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Sidebar|sidebar}} {{#invoke:sidebar|sidebar | class = hlist | pretitle = Part of the nature series | title = Weather

| headingstyle = border-top:#ccc 1px solid; | heading1 = Calendar seasons | content1 =

| heading2 = Tropical seasons | content2 =

| heading3 = Storms | content3 =

| heading4 = Precipitation | content4 =

| heading5 = Topics | content5 =

| belowstyle = border-top:#ccc 1px solid; border-bottom:#ccc 1px solid; | below = Weather portal

}} Climate is the long-term pattern of weather in a particular area.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> It is measured by assessing the patterns of variation in temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind, precipitation, atmospheric particle count and other meteorological variables in a given region over long periods of time. Climate is different from weather, in that weather only describes the short-term conditions of these variables in a given region.

A region's climate is generated by the climate system, which has five components: atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere.<ref name="IPCC glossary">AR4 SYR Synthesis Report Annexes. Ipcc.ch. Retrieved on 2011-06-28.</ref>

The climate of a location is affected by its latitude, terrain, and altitude, as well as nearby water bodies and their currents. Climates can be classified according to the average and the typical ranges of different variables, most commonly temperature and precipitation. The most commonly used classification scheme was originally developed by Wladimir Köppen. The Thornthwaite system,<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> in use since 1948, incorporates evapotranspiration along with temperature and precipitation information and is used in studying animal species diversity and potential effects of climate changes. The Bergeron and Spatial Synoptic Classification systems focus on the origin of air masses that define the climate of a region.

Paleoclimatology is the study of ancient climates. Since direct observations of climate are not available before the 19th century, paleoclimates are inferred from proxy variables that include non-biotic evidence such as sediments found in lake beds and ice cores, and biotic evidence such as tree rings and coral. Climate models are mathematical models of past, present and future climates. Climate change may occur over long and short timescales from a variety of factors; recent warming is discussed in global warming.


Climate sections
Intro  Definition  Climate classification  Record  Climate change  See also  References  Further reading  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Definition
<<>>