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Age of responsibility::Child

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Age of responsibility The age at which children are considered responsible for their society-bound actions (e. g. marriage, voting, etc.) has also changed over time, and this is reflected in the way they are treated in courts of law. In Roman times, children were regarded as not culpable for crimes, a position later adopted by the Church. In the 19th century, children younger than seven years old were believed incapable of crime. Children from the age of seven forward were considered responsible for their actions. Therefore, they could face criminal charges, be sent to adult prison, and be punished like adults by whipping, branding or hanging.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> Today, in many countries like Canada and the United States, children twelve and older are held responsible for their actions. They may be sent to special correctional institutions, such as juvenile hall.

Surveys have found that at least 25 countries around the world have no specified age for compulsory education. Minimum employment age and marriage age also vary. In at least 125 countries, children aged 7–15 may be taken to court and risk imprisonment for criminal acts. The age limit of voluntary/involuntary military service is also disputed at the international level.<ref> {{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> In some countries, children are legally obliged to go to school until they are 14 or 15 years old, but may also work before that age. A child's right to education is threatened by early marriage, child labour and imprisonment.<ref name="Melchiorre">Melchiorre, A. (2004) At What Age?...are school-children employed, married and taken to court?</ref>


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Age of responsibility
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