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::Cecily Neville, Duchess of York

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{{#invoke:redirect hatnote|redirect}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=EngvarB |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} Cecily Neville, Duchess of York (3 May 1415 – 31 May 1495)<ref>http://www.r3.org/basics/basic6.html</ref> was an English noblewoman, the wife of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York, and the mother of two Kings of England, Edward IV and Richard III. Cecily Neville was known as "the Rose of Raby", because she was born at Raby Castle in Durham, and "Proud Cis", because of her pride and a temper that went with it, although she was also known for her piety. She herself signed her name "Cecylle".

Her husband, the Duke of York, was the leading contender for the throne of England from the House of York during the period of the War of the Roses until his death in 1460. His son Edward, Earl of March, actually assumed the throne as Edward IV in 1461, after the deposition of King Henry VI of the House of Lancaster. The Duchess of York thus narrowly missed becoming queen consort of England.<ref>Alison J Spedding. At the King's Pleasure: The Testament of Cecily Neville, University of Birmingham. Midland History, Vol 35, No 2, 2010. pg 256-72.</ref> However, in 1477, following the marriage of her grandson Richard of York, the duchess was accorded the title Queen of right after using the title of Cecily, the king's mother and late wife unto Richard in right king of England and of France and lord of Ireland since 1464.<ref name="laynesmith">Joanna Laynesmith. The Kings' Mother, History today. 56, no. 3, (2006): 38</ref><ref>William Henry Black, Illustrations of ancient state and chivalry from manuscripts preserved in the Ashmolean museum, 1840, p29</ref>


Cecily Neville, Duchess of York sections
Intro  Family  Duchess of York  Mother of two kings  Death and will  Ancestry  Issue  Coat of arms  Fictional portrayals  References  Further reading  External links  

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{{#invoke:redirect hatnote|redirect}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=EngvarB |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} Cecily Neville, Duchess of York (3 May 1415 – 31 May 1495)<ref>http://www.r3.org/basics/basic6.html</ref> was an English noblewoman, the wife of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York, and the mother of two Kings of England, Edward IV and Richard III. Cecily Neville was known as "the Rose of Raby", because she was born at Raby Castle in Durham, and "Proud Cis", because of her pride and a temper that went with it, although she was also known for her piety. She herself signed her name "Cecylle".

Her husband, the Duke of York, was the leading contender for the throne of England from the House of York during the period of the War of the Roses until his death in 1460. His son Edward, Earl of March, actually assumed the throne as Edward IV in 1461, after the deposition of King Henry VI of the House of Lancaster. The Duchess of York thus narrowly missed becoming queen consort of England.<ref>Alison J Spedding. At the King's Pleasure: The Testament of Cecily Neville, University of Birmingham. Midland History, Vol 35, No 2, 2010. pg 256-72.</ref> However, in 1477, following the marriage of her grandson Richard of York, the duchess was accorded the title Queen of right after using the title of Cecily, the king's mother and late wife unto Richard in right king of England and of France and lord of Ireland since 1464.<ref name="laynesmith">Joanna Laynesmith. The Kings' Mother, History today. 56, no. 3, (2006): 38</ref><ref>William Henry Black, Illustrations of ancient state and chivalry from manuscripts preserved in the Ashmolean museum, 1840, p29</ref>


Cecily Neville, Duchess of York sections
Intro  Family  Duchess of York  Mother of two kings  Death and will  Ancestry  Issue  Coat of arms  Fictional portrayals  References  Further reading  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Family
<<>>