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The Great Roman Civil War (49–45 BC), also known as Caesar's Civil War, was one of the last politico-military conflicts in the Roman Republic before the establishment of the Roman Empire. It began as a series of political and military confrontations, between Julius Caesar (100–44 BC), his political supporters (broadly known as Populares), and his legions, against the Optimates (or Boni), the politically conservative and socially traditionalist faction of the Roman Senate, who were supported by Pompey (106–48 BC) and his legions.<ref>Kohn, G.C. Dictionary of Wars (1986) p. 374</ref>

After a five-year-long (49–45 BC) politico-military struggle, fought in Italy, Albania, Greece, Egypt, Africa, and Hispania, Caesar defeated the last of the Optimates in the Battle of Munda and became Dictator perpetuo (Perpetual Dictator) of Rome.<ref>Hornblower, S., Spawforth, A. (eds.) The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (1998) pp. 219-24</ref> The changes to Roman government concomitant to the war mostly eliminated the political traditions of the Roman Republic (509–27 BC) and led to the Roman Empire (27 BC–AD 476).


Caesar's Civil War sections
Intro   Pre-war politico\u2013military situation    Chronology    Aftermath    References    Bibliography   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Pre-war politico\u2013military situation
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Caesar::roman    Pompey::battle    Caesar's::senate    Julius::egypt    Legions::pompey's    Consul::forces

{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Refimprove |date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Message box|ambox}} }} {{#invoke:Infobox military conflict|main}} {{#invoke:Navbox|navbox}} {{#invoke:Navbox|navbox}}

The Great Roman Civil War (49–45 BC), also known as Caesar's Civil War, was one of the last politico-military conflicts in the Roman Republic before the establishment of the Roman Empire. It began as a series of political and military confrontations, between Julius Caesar (100–44 BC), his political supporters (broadly known as Populares), and his legions, against the Optimates (or Boni), the politically conservative and socially traditionalist faction of the Roman Senate, who were supported by Pompey (106–48 BC) and his legions.<ref>Kohn, G.C. Dictionary of Wars (1986) p. 374</ref>

After a five-year-long (49–45 BC) politico-military struggle, fought in Italy, Albania, Greece, Egypt, Africa, and Hispania, Caesar defeated the last of the Optimates in the Battle of Munda and became Dictator perpetuo (Perpetual Dictator) of Rome.<ref>Hornblower, S., Spawforth, A. (eds.) The Oxford Companion to Classical Civilization (1998) pp. 219-24</ref> The changes to Roman government concomitant to the war mostly eliminated the political traditions of the Roman Republic (509–27 BC) and led to the Roman Empire (27 BC–AD 476).


Caesar's Civil War sections
Intro   Pre-war politico\u2013military situation    Chronology    Aftermath    References    Bibliography   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Pre-war politico\u2013military situation
<<>>