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Black-and-gray 1980s-era base station, with tall round desk microphone
Typical 1980s CB base station, used with outdoor antenna. This radio may also be used in an automobile, since it is powered by 13.8V DC. Shown with Astatic Power D-104 desk mic
Small black mobile radio with hand-held microphone and long, coiled mic cord
Cobra 18 WX ST II mobile CB radio with microphone

Citizens Band radio (also known as CB radio) is, in many countries, a system of short-distance radio communications between individuals on a selection of 40 channels within the 27 MHz (11 m) band. Citizens band is distinct from the FRS, GMRS, MURS, and Amateur Radio Service ("ham" radio) systems. In many countries, CB operation does not require a license, and (unlike amateur radio) it may be used for business or personal communications. Like many other two-way radio services, citizens band channels are shared by many users. Only one station may transmit at a time; other stations must listen and wait for the shared channel to be available. It is customary for stations waiting to use a shared channel to broadcast the single word "Break" during a lull in the conversation. This informs people using the channel that others are waiting.

A number of countries have created similar radio services, with varying technical standards and requirements for licensing. While they may be known by other names, such as the General Radio Service in Canada,<ref>Canadian "General Radio Service"</ref> they often use similar frequencies (26 to 28 MHz), have similar uses, and similar technical standards. Although licenses may be required, eligibility is generally simple. Some countries also have personal radio services in the UHF band, such as the European PMR446 and the Australian UHF CB.

History


Citizens band radio sections
Intro  United States  Frequency allocations  [[Citizens_band_radio?section={{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}}Current_use|{{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}}Current use]]  Technology  Antennas  [[Citizens_band_radio?section={{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}}Working_skip|{{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}}Working skip]]  Freebanding and export radios  Callbook  See also  References  Sources  External links  

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Black-and-gray 1980s-era base station, with tall round desk microphone
Typical 1980s CB base station, used with outdoor antenna. This radio may also be used in an automobile, since it is powered by 13.8V DC. Shown with Astatic Power D-104 desk mic
Small black mobile radio with hand-held microphone and long, coiled mic cord
Cobra 18 WX ST II mobile CB radio with microphone

Citizens Band radio (also known as CB radio) is, in many countries, a system of short-distance radio communications between individuals on a selection of 40 channels within the 27 MHz (11 m) band. Citizens band is distinct from the FRS, GMRS, MURS, and Amateur Radio Service ("ham" radio) systems. In many countries, CB operation does not require a license, and (unlike amateur radio) it may be used for business or personal communications. Like many other two-way radio services, citizens band channels are shared by many users. Only one station may transmit at a time; other stations must listen and wait for the shared channel to be available. It is customary for stations waiting to use a shared channel to broadcast the single word "Break" during a lull in the conversation. This informs people using the channel that others are waiting.

A number of countries have created similar radio services, with varying technical standards and requirements for licensing. While they may be known by other names, such as the General Radio Service in Canada,<ref>Canadian "General Radio Service"</ref> they often use similar frequencies (26 to 28 MHz), have similar uses, and similar technical standards. Although licenses may be required, eligibility is generally simple. Some countries also have personal radio services in the UHF band, such as the European PMR446 and the Australian UHF CB.

History


Citizens band radio sections
Intro  United States  Frequency allocations  [[Citizens_band_radio?section={{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}}Current_use|{{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}}Current use]]  Technology  Antennas  [[Citizens_band_radio?section={{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}}Working_skip|{{safesubst:#invoke:anchor|main}}Working skip]]  Freebanding and export radios  Callbook  See also  References  Sources  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: United States
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