Actions

::Bullying

::concepts

Bullying::bullying    First::title    Journal::pages    Author::books    Volume::issue    Their::school

{{#invoke:redirect hatnote|redirect}} {{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Protection banner|main}} {{#invoke:Pp-move-indef|main}}

An example of bullying.

Bullying is the use of force, threat, or coercion to abuse, intimidate, or aggressively dominate others. The behavior is often repeated and habitual. One essential prerequisite is the perception, by the bully or by others, of an imbalance of social or physical power, which distinguishes bullying from conflict.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> Behaviors used to assert such domination can include verbal harassment or threat, physical assault or coercion, and such acts may be directed repeatedly towards particular targets. Rationalizations for such behavior sometimes include differences of social class, race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, appearance, behavior, body language, personality, reputation, lineage, strength, size or ability.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> If bullying is done by a group, it is called mobbing.<ref name="DavenportSchwartz1999">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref>

Bullying can be defined in many different ways. The UK has no legal definition of bullying,<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> while some U.S. states have laws against it.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> Bullying is divided into four basic types of abuse – emotional (sometimes called relational), verbal, physical, and cyber.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> It typically involves subtle methods of coercion, such as intimidation.

Bullying ranges from simple one-on-one bullying to more complex bullying in which the bully may have one or more "lieutenants" who may seem to be willing to assist the primary bully in his or her bullying activities. Bullying in school and the workplace is also referred to as peer abuse.<ref name="Bennett2006">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> Robert W. Fuller has analyzed bullying in the context of rankism.

A bullying culture can develop in any context in which humans interact with each other. This includes school, family, the workplace, home, and neighborhoods. In a 2012 study of male adolescent American football players, "the strongest predictor [of bullying] was the perception of whether the most influential male in a player's life would approve of the bullying behavior".<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref>


Bullying sections
Intro  Definitions  Etymology  Characteristics  Effects  Dark triad  Projection  Emotional intelligence  In different contexts   Prevention   See also  References  Further reading  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Definitions
<<>>