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::Animal bite

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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} An animal bite is a wound received from the teeth of an animal, including humans. Animals may bite in self-defence, in an attempt to prey on food, and as part of normal interactions. Other bite attacks may be apparently unprovoked. Self-inflicted bites occur in some genetic illnesses, such as Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Biting is an act that occurs when an animal uses its teeth to pierce another object, including food, flesh, and inanimate matter. A person bitten by an animal potentially carrying parvovirus or rabies virus should consult a physician immediately. Those who have been bitten by an animal may also develop bacterial infections of the bone called osteomyelitis which can become life-threatening if untreated, whether or not the animal has parvovirus or rabies virus.


Animal bite sections
Intro  Signs and symptoms  Causes  Treatment  See also  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Signs and symptoms
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Bites::wound    Rabies::title    Animal::injuries    Other::humans    Animal::tetanus    Oehler::journal

{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} An animal bite is a wound received from the teeth of an animal, including humans. Animals may bite in self-defence, in an attempt to prey on food, and as part of normal interactions. Other bite attacks may be apparently unprovoked. Self-inflicted bites occur in some genetic illnesses, such as Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Biting is an act that occurs when an animal uses its teeth to pierce another object, including food, flesh, and inanimate matter. A person bitten by an animal potentially carrying parvovirus or rabies virus should consult a physician immediately. Those who have been bitten by an animal may also develop bacterial infections of the bone called osteomyelitis which can become life-threatening if untreated, whether or not the animal has parvovirus or rabies virus.


Animal bite sections
Intro  Signs and symptoms  Causes  Treatment  See also  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Signs and symptoms
<<>>