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  • Psychology portal

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Some of the research that is conducted in the field of psychology is more "fundamental" than the research conducted in the applied psychological disciplines, and does not necessarily have a direct application. The subdisciplines within psychology that can be thought to reflect a basic-science orientation include biological psychology, cognitive psychology, neuropsychology, and so on. Research in these subdisciplines is characterized by methodological rigor. The concern of psychology as a basic science is in understanding the laws and processes that underlie behavior, cognition, and emotion. Psychology as a basic science provides a foundation for applied psychology. Applied psychology, by contrast, involves the application of psychological principles and theories yielded up by the basic psychological sciences; these applications are aimed at overcoming problems or promoting well-being in areas such as mental and physical health and education.


Basic science (psychology) sections
Intro  Abnormal psychology  Biological psychology  Cognitive psychology  Developmental psychology  Experimental psychology  Evolutionary psychology  Mathematical psychology  Neuropsychology  Personality psychology  Psychophysics  Social psychology   Additional areas    See also   References  

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