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Growth and reproduction::Bacteria

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Growth and reproduction

Many bacteria reproduce through binary fission, which is compared to mitosis and meiosis in this image.

{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} Unlike in multicellular organisms, increases in cell size (cell growth) and reproduction by cell division are tightly linked in unicellular organisms. Bacteria grow to a fixed size and then reproduce through binary fission, a form of asexual reproduction.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> Under optimal conditions, bacteria can grow and divide extremely rapidly, and bacterial populations can double as quickly as every 9.8 minutes.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> In cell division, two identical clone daughter cells are produced. Some bacteria, while still reproducing asexually, form more complex reproductive structures that help disperse the newly formed daughter cells. Examples include fruiting body formation by Myxobacteria and aerial hyphae formation by Streptomyces, or budding. Budding involves a cell forming a protrusion that breaks away and produces a daughter cell.

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In the laboratory, bacteria are usually grown using solid or liquid media. Solid growth media, such as agar plates, are used to isolate pure cultures of a bacterial strain. However, liquid growth media are used when measurement of growth or large volumes of cells are required. Growth in stirred liquid media occurs as an even cell suspension, making the cultures easy to divide and transfer, although isolating single bacteria from liquid media is difficult. The use of selective media (media with specific nutrients added or deficient, or with antibiotics added) can help identify specific organisms.<ref name=Thomson>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref>

Most laboratory techniques for growing bacteria use high levels of nutrients to produce large amounts of cells cheaply and quickly. However, in natural environments, nutrients are limited, meaning that bacteria cannot continue to reproduce indefinitely. This nutrient limitation has led the evolution of different growth strategies (see r/K selection theory). Some organisms can grow extremely rapidly when nutrients become available, such as the formation of algal (and cyanobacterial) blooms that often occur in lakes during the summer.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> Other organisms have adaptations to harsh environments, such as the production of multiple antibiotics by Streptomyces that inhibit the growth of competing microorganisms.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> In nature, many organisms live in communities (e.g., biofilms) that may allow for increased supply of nutrients and protection from environmental stresses.<ref name=Davey/> These relationships can be essential for growth of a particular organism or group of organisms (syntrophy).<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref>

Bacterial growth follows four phases. When a population of bacteria first enter a high-nutrient environment that allows growth, the cells need to adapt to their new environment. The first phase of growth is the lag phase, a period of slow growth when the cells are adapting to the high-nutrient environment and preparing for fast growth. The lag phase has high biosynthesis rates, as proteins necessary for rapid growth are produced.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> The second phase of growth is the log phase, also known as the logarithmic or exponential phase. The log phase is marked by rapid exponential growth. The rate at which cells grow during this phase is known as the growth rate (k), and the time it takes the cells to double is known as the generation time (g). During log phase, nutrients are metabolised at maximum speed until one of the nutrients is depleted and starts limiting growth. The third phase of growth is the stationary phase and is caused by depleted nutrients. The cells reduce their metabolic activity and consume non-essential cellular proteins. The stationary phase is a transition from rapid growth to a stress response state and there is increased expression of genes involved in DNA repair, antioxidant metabolism and nutrient transport.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> The final phase is the death phase where the bacteria run out of nutrients and die.


Bacteria sections
Intro  Etymology  Origin and early evolution  Morphology  Cellular structure  Metabolism  Growth and reproduction  Genetics  Behavior  Classification and identification  Interactions with other organisms  Significance in technology and industry  History of bacteriology  See also  References  Further reading  External links  

Growth and reproduction
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