Actions

::Attitude (psychology)

::concepts

Attitude::behavior    Journal::first    Theory::attitude    Social::change    People::title    Issue::pages

{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Refimprove |date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Message box|ambox}} }}

In psychology, an attitude is an expression of favor or disfavor toward a person, place, thing, or event (the attitude object). Prominent psychologist Gordon Allport once described attitudes "the most distinctive and indispensable concept in contemporary social psychology."<ref>Allport, Gordon. (1935). "Attitudes," in A Handbook of Social Psychology, ed. C. Murchison. Worcester, MA: Clark University Press, 789–844.</ref> Attitude can be formed from a person's past and present.<ref>Allport, Gordon. (1935). "Attitudes," in A Handbook of Social Psychology, ed. C. Murchison. Worcester, MA: Clark University Press, 789–844.</ref> Key topics in the study of attitudes include attitude measurement, attitude change, consumer behavior, and attitude-behavior relationships.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref>


Attitude (psychology) sections
Intro  Definitions   Measurement   Structure  Function  Formation  Change  Attitude-behavior relationship  See also  References  Further reading  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Definitions
<<>>