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Clockwise from upper left: a self-portrait by Vincent van Gogh; a female ancestor figure by a Chokwe artist; detail from the Birth of Venus by Sandro Botticelli; and an Okinawan Shisa lion.

Art is a diverse range of human activities and the products of those activities, usually involving imaginative or technical skill. In their most general form these activities include the production of works of art, the criticism of art, the study of the history of art, and the aesthetic dissemination of art. This article focuses primarily on the visual arts, which includes the creation of images or objects in fields including painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, and other visual media. Architecture is often included as one of the visual arts; however, like the decorative arts, it involves the creation of objects where the practical considerations of use are essential—in a way that they usually are not in a painting, for example. Music, theatre, film, dance, and other performing arts, as well as literature and other media such as interactive media, are included in a broader definition of art or the arts.<ref>"Art, n. 1". OED Online. December 2011. Oxford University Press. http://www.oed.com. (Accessed 26 February 2012.); {{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> Until the 17th century, art referred to any skill or mastery and was not differentiated from crafts or sciences. In modern usage after the 17th century, where aesthetic considerations are paramount, the fine arts are separated and distinguished from acquired skills in general, such as the decorative or applied arts.

Art may be characterized in terms of mimesis (its representation of reality), expression, communication of emotion, or other qualities. During the Romantic period, art came to be seen as "a special faculty of the human mind to be classified with religion and science".<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[dead link] }}</ref> Though the definition of what constitutes art is disputed<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> and has changed over time, general descriptions mention an idea of imaginative or technical skill stemming from human agency<ref>What Is Art?{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[dead link] }}</ref> and creation.<ref name="britannica.com">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>

The nature of art, and related concepts such as creativity and interpretation, are explored in a branch of philosophy known as aesthetics.<ref>Kennick, William ed,{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Clarify |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} and W. E. Kennick, Art and philosophy : readings in aesthetics New York: St. Martin's Press, 1979, pp. xi–xiii. ISBN 0-312-05391-6.</ref>


Art sections
Intro   Creative art and fine art   History  Forms, genres, media, and styles  Purpose of art  Public access  Controversies  Theory  Classification disputes  See also  Notes  Bibliography  Further reading  External links  

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