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Lucy Parsons after her arrest for rioting during an unemployment protest at Hull House in Chicago, Illinois. 1915
Arrested men in Rio de Janeiro.
A United States Army soldier arrests a man in June 2007, during the Iraq War.

An arrest is the act of depriving a person of their liberty usually in relation to the purported investigation or prevention of crime and presenting (the arrestee) to a procedure as part of the criminal justice system. The term is Anglo-Norman in origin and is related to the French word arrêt, meaning "stop".

Arrest, when used in its ordinary and natural sense, means the apprehension of a person or the deprivation of a person's liberty. The question whether the person is under arrest or not depends not on the legality of the arrest, but on whether the person has been deprived of personal liberty of movement. When used in the legal sense in the procedure connected with criminal offences, an arrest consists in the taking into custody of another person under authority empowered by law, to be held or detained to answer a criminal charge or to prevent the commission of a criminal or further offence. The essential elements to constitute an arrest in the above sense are that there must be an intent to arrest under the authority, accompanied by a seizure or detention of the person in the manner known to law, which is so understood by the person arrested
Directorate of Enforcement v Deepak Mahajan, (1994) 3 SCC 440 at ¶46 (SC of India)).

Police and various other bodies have powers of arrest. In some places, the power is more general; for example in England and Wales, any person can arrest "anyone whom he has reasonable grounds for suspecting to be committing, have committed or be guilty of committing an indictable offence," although certain conditions must be met before taking such action.<ref>section 24a, Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984</ref>

Article 9 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights states that, "No one shall be subjected to arbitrary arrest, detention or exile."


Arrest sections
Intro  Etymology  Procedure  Powers of arrest  Warnings on arrest  Search on arrest  Non-criminal arrests  Following arrest  See also  References  Further reading  External links  

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Arrest::person    Police::arrested    United::under    Wales::england    Court::states    Criminal::criminal

{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}}

Lucy Parsons after her arrest for rioting during an unemployment protest at Hull House in Chicago, Illinois. 1915
Arrested men in Rio de Janeiro.
A United States Army soldier arrests a man in June 2007, during the Iraq War.

An arrest is the act of depriving a person of their liberty usually in relation to the purported investigation or prevention of crime and presenting (the arrestee) to a procedure as part of the criminal justice system. The term is Anglo-Norman in origin and is related to the French word arrêt, meaning "stop".

Arrest, when used in its ordinary and natural sense, means the apprehension of a person or the deprivation of a person's liberty. The question whether the person is under arrest or not depends not on the legality of the arrest, but on whether the person has been deprived of personal liberty of movement. When used in the legal sense in the procedure connected with criminal offences, an arrest consists in the taking into custody of another person under authority empowered by law, to be held or detained to answer a criminal charge or to prevent the commission of a criminal or further offence. The essential elements to constitute an arrest in the above sense are that there must be an intent to arrest under the authority, accompanied by a seizure or detention of the person in the manner known to law, which is so understood by the person arrested
Directorate of Enforcement v Deepak Mahajan, (1994) 3 SCC 440 at ¶46 (SC of India)).

Police and various other bodies have powers of arrest. In some places, the power is more general; for example in England and Wales, any person can arrest "anyone whom he has reasonable grounds for suspecting to be committing, have committed or be guilty of committing an indictable offence," although certain conditions must be met before taking such action.<ref>section 24a, Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984</ref>

Article 9 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights states that, "No one shall be subjected to arbitrary arrest, detention or exile."


Arrest sections
Intro  Etymology  Procedure  Powers of arrest  Warnings on arrest  Search on arrest  Non-criminal arrests  Following arrest  See also  References  Further reading  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Etymology
<<>>