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Void vs voidable marriage::Annulment

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Marriage::canon    Voidable::canon    Church::catholic    Vatican::parties    Archive::consent    Married::divorce

Void vs voidable marriage A difference exists between a void marriage and a voidable marriage .

A void marriage is a marriage which has no legal recognition (was not legally valid in the first place, i.e. is void ab initio). Such a marriage is automatically null, although a declaration of nullity is required to establish this. The process of obtaining a declaration of nullity is similar to an annulment process. Despite its retroactive nature, children born before an annulment are considered legitimate in many countries. Reasons for a void marriage may include, depending on jurisdiction, consanguinity (incestual marriage), bigamy, group marriage, child marriage.<ref>http://public.leginfo.state.ny.us/menugetf.cgi?COMMONQUERY=LAWS</ref><ref name="gov.uk">https://www.gov.uk/how-to-annul-marriage/when-you-can-annul-a-marriage</ref>

A voidable marriage is a marriage which can be canceled at the option of one of the parties. It is a valid marriage, but is subject to cancellation if contested in court by one of the parties to the marriage. The validity of a voidable marriage can only be made by one of the parties to the marriage; thus, a voidable marriage cannot be annulled after the death of one of the parties. A marriage can be voidable for a variety of reasons, depending on jurisdiction. Forced/coerced marriages are usually voidable. In countries where marriage law is influenced by religion (especially Roman Catholicism) there can be numerous reasons for a marriage to be voidable (see section below).

The principal difference between a void and voidable marriage is that, in the case of the former, because it is invalid from the beginning, it can be voided ex-officio; while in the case of the latter it is only the spouse himself/herself who can ask for an annulment (in some cases such as if the spouse is a minor or mentally disabled a third party representative such as a parent, legal guardian or child protective service can start an annulment acting as the legal representative of said spouse). These differences are very relevant, because they represent the official policy on issues such as forced marriage for instance: if such marriage is classified legally as void - then the state can cancel it even against the will of the spouses; if it is voidable - then the state cannot act in the absence of an application by a spouse even if the state knows the marriage is forced.<ref>http://ubplj.org/index.php/dlj/article/view/935</ref>


Annulment sections
Intro  Void vs voidable marriage  Annulment in Christianity  Annulment in Islam  Annulment in the state of New York  Annulment in the state of Nevada  Annulment in England and Wales  Annulment in Australia  Annulment in France  Multiple annulments  Controversies  See also  Notes  External links  

Void vs voidable marriage
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