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Multiple annulments::Annulment

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Multiple annulments Henry VIII of England had three of his six marriages annulled.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref>Anne of Cleves: Biography, Portraits, Primary Sources</ref><ref>About Anne of Cleves</ref><ref name="tudorhistory.org">Anne Boleyn</ref> These marriages were to Catherine of Aragon (on the grounds that she had already been married to his brother—although this annulment is not recognized by the Catholic Church); Anne Boleyn<ref name="tudorhistory.org"/> (on the grounds that she had allegedly seduced him with witchcraft and was unfaithful—not wishing to execute his legal wife, he offered her an easy death if she would agree to an annulment); and Anne of Cleves<ref>Anne of Cleves</ref> (on the grounds of non-consummation of the marriage and the fact that she had previously been engaged to someone else). Catherine Howard never had her marriage annulled. She had committed adultery with Thomas Culpeper during the marriage, and she had flirted with members of his court. Because of this, on November 22, 1541, it was proclaimed at Hampton Court that she had "forfeited the honour and title of Queen," and was from then on to be known only as the Lady Catherine Howard. Under this title she was executed for high treason three months later.<ref>The Politics of Marriage: Henry VIII and his Queens. - book reviews Contemporary Review, Jan, 1995 by Michael L. Nash</ref>


Annulment sections
Intro  Void vs voidable marriage  Annulment in Christianity  Annulment in Islam  Annulment in the state of New York  Annulment in the state of Nevada  Annulment in England and Wales  Annulment in Australia  Annulment in France  Multiple annulments  Controversies  See also  Notes  External links  

Multiple annulments
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