Actions

::Baltimore riot of 1968

::concepts



{{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} {{#invoke:Navbox|navbox}}

Black Baltimoreans rioted from April 6 to April 14, 1968. The uprising included crowds filling the streets, burning and looting local businesses, and confronting the police and national guard.

The immediate cause of the riot was the April 4 assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Memphis, Tennessee, which triggered unrest in 125 cities across the United States. These events are sometimes described as the Holy Week Uprising.<ref name=Balt68Levy />

Spiro T. Agnew, the Governor of Maryland, called out thousands of National Guard troops and 500 Maryland State Police to quell the disturbance. When it was determined that the state forces could not control the rebellion, Agnew requested Federal troops from President Lyndon B. Johnson.


Baltimore riot of 1968 sections
Intro  Background  Course of events   Military response   Outcome  In popular culture  See also  References  Further reading  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Background
<<>>

Maryland::guard    April::national    States::united    Troops::riots    Infantry::regiment    Title::category

{{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} {{#invoke:Navbox|navbox}}

Black Baltimoreans rioted from April 6 to April 14, 1968. The uprising included crowds filling the streets, burning and looting local businesses, and confronting the police and national guard.

The immediate cause of the riot was the April 4 assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Memphis, Tennessee, which triggered unrest in 125 cities across the United States. These events are sometimes described as the Holy Week Uprising.<ref name=Balt68Levy />

Spiro T. Agnew, the Governor of Maryland, called out thousands of National Guard troops and 500 Maryland State Police to quell the disturbance. When it was determined that the state forces could not control the rebellion, Agnew requested Federal troops from President Lyndon B. Johnson.


Baltimore riot of 1968 sections
Intro  Background  Course of events   Military response   Outcome  In popular culture  See also  References  Further reading  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Background
<<>>