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::Maryland Terrapins football, 1856–1946

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Maryland playing Johns Hopkins in 1919 during Curley Byrd's coaching tenure.

The modern Maryland Terrapins football program representing the University of Maryland traces its lineage to the team first formed at what was then the Maryland Agricultural College (MAC) in 1892. In the initial years, due to the rudimentary state of intercollegiate athletics and interstate travel, all games were played against local colleges, high schools, and athletic clubs.

In 1902, Maryland hired its first professional coach, John Markey, and soon after drafted a "football philosophy", an early attempt at a codification of college football. During his tenure as head coach from 1911 to 1934, Harry C. "Curley" Byrd significantly increased Maryland's strength of schedule, and recorded victories over then-powerhouses Penn and Yale. Byrd also greatly increased school support and interest in the sport, and was responsible for the building of the school's first stadium in 1923.

Byrd became the university president in 1935, and continued his support for Maryland football from that office. As a coach, he was succeeded by several prominent individuals, namely Clark Shaughnessy, who had perfected the T-formation, and Paul "Bear" Bryant, who later went onto great success at Alabama. After just one season at Maryland, a conflict with Byrd resulted in Bryant's departure.


Maryland Terrapins football, 1856–1946 sections
Intro  The early years: 1856\u20131901  The first professional coaches: 1902\u20131910  The Curley Byrd era: 1911\u20131934  Big-name coaches: 1935\u20131946  See also  References  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: The early years: 1856\u20131901
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Maryland::football    Season::coach    College::first    Ungrady::against    Football::record    Hopkins::ungrady

{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}}

Maryland playing Johns Hopkins in 1919 during Curley Byrd's coaching tenure.

The modern Maryland Terrapins football program representing the University of Maryland traces its lineage to the team first formed at what was then the Maryland Agricultural College (MAC) in 1892. In the initial years, due to the rudimentary state of intercollegiate athletics and interstate travel, all games were played against local colleges, high schools, and athletic clubs.

In 1902, Maryland hired its first professional coach, John Markey, and soon after drafted a "football philosophy", an early attempt at a codification of college football. During his tenure as head coach from 1911 to 1934, Harry C. "Curley" Byrd significantly increased Maryland's strength of schedule, and recorded victories over then-powerhouses Penn and Yale. Byrd also greatly increased school support and interest in the sport, and was responsible for the building of the school's first stadium in 1923.

Byrd became the university president in 1935, and continued his support for Maryland football from that office. As a coach, he was succeeded by several prominent individuals, namely Clark Shaughnessy, who had perfected the T-formation, and Paul "Bear" Bryant, who later went onto great success at Alabama. After just one season at Maryland, a conflict with Byrd resulted in Bryant's departure.


Maryland Terrapins football, 1856–1946 sections
Intro  The early years: 1856\u20131901  The first professional coaches: 1902\u20131910  The Curley Byrd era: 1911\u20131934  Big-name coaches: 1935\u20131946  See also  References  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: The early years: 1856\u20131901
<<>>