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18th-century American piracy of British literature refers to the practice of reprinting British books in the USA without the permission of the original author or publisher.

Plagiarism is traditionally defined as “the process of copying another person's idea or written work and claiming it as original” <ref>Guralnik, D: Webster's New World Dictionary, page 1087. Collins World 1976.</ref> This definition applies to many aspects of written work in today’s world and has serious consequences if found guilty of committing it, but this idea has not always been in place. During the 18th century, it was extremely common for British Literature to be reprinted across the Atlantic Ocean in America without any acknowledgement or payment given to the original author. This form of plagiarism, referred to as literary piracy, was not an easy action to control because of the immense distance between the two countries, and the lack of any real international law which would work to protect the original authors in England. It was not until 1988 that these international laws were truly set in place and able to be enforced with any form of consistency.


18th-century American piracy of British literature sections
Intro  Early piracy  Establishment of copyright laws  International piracy  References  Further reading  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Early piracy
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{{#invoke:Message box|ambox}}

18th-century American piracy of British literature refers to the practice of reprinting British books in the USA without the permission of the original author or publisher.

Plagiarism is traditionally defined as “the process of copying another person's idea or written work and claiming it as original” <ref>Guralnik, D: Webster's New World Dictionary, page 1087. Collins World 1976.</ref> This definition applies to many aspects of written work in today’s world and has serious consequences if found guilty of committing it, but this idea has not always been in place. During the 18th century, it was extremely common for British Literature to be reprinted across the Atlantic Ocean in America without any acknowledgement or payment given to the original author. This form of plagiarism, referred to as literary piracy, was not an easy action to control because of the immense distance between the two countries, and the lack of any real international law which would work to protect the original authors in England. It was not until 1988 that these international laws were truly set in place and able to be enforced with any form of consistency.


18th-century American piracy of British literature sections
Intro  Early piracy  Establishment of copyright laws  International piracy  References  Further reading  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Early piracy
<<>>