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The 1888 Minneapolis General Conference Session was a meeting of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists held in Minneapolis, Minnesota in October 1888. It is regarded as a landmark event in the history of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Key participants were Alonzo T. Jones and Ellet J. Waggoner, who presented a message on justification supported by Ellen G. White, but resisted by leaders such as G. I. Butler, Uriah Smith and others. The session discussed crucial theological issues such as the meaning of "righteousness by faith", the nature of the Godhead, the relationship between law and grace, and Justification and its relationship to Sanctification.


1888 Minneapolis General Conference (Adventist) sections
Intro  Introduction  Foundational experience  Sources of the developing conflict  Open confrontation  Season of debate  Most Precious Message  See also  References  Bibliography  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Introduction
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Waggoner::christ    White::ellen    Jones::message    Church::their    General::sabbath    Faith::review

The 1888 Minneapolis General Conference Session was a meeting of the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists held in Minneapolis, Minnesota in October 1888. It is regarded as a landmark event in the history of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Key participants were Alonzo T. Jones and Ellet J. Waggoner, who presented a message on justification supported by Ellen G. White, but resisted by leaders such as G. I. Butler, Uriah Smith and others. The session discussed crucial theological issues such as the meaning of "righteousness by faith", the nature of the Godhead, the relationship between law and grace, and Justification and its relationship to Sanctification.


1888 Minneapolis General Conference (Adventist) sections
Intro  Introduction  Foundational experience  Sources of the developing conflict  Open confrontation  Season of debate  Most Precious Message  See also  References  Bibliography  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Introduction
<<>>