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{{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} The Colt Buntline Special is a long-barreled variant of the Colt Single Action Army revolver that author Stuart N. Lake described in his best-selling but largely fictionalized 1931 biography, Wyatt Earp: Frontier Marshal. According to Lake, dime novelist Ned Buntline had five Buntline Specials commissioned. Lake described them as extra-long, {{safesubst:#invoke:convert|convert}}-long barrel Colt Single Action Army revolvers. Lake wrote that Buntline presented them to five lawmen in thanks for their help with contributing “local color” to his western yarns. But modern researchers have not found any evidence to confirm that Buntline ordered the guns or that Colt manufactured them in that time period.

Lake attributed the gun to Earp, but modern researchers have not found any supporting evidence from secondary sources or in available primary documentation of the gun's existence prior to the publication of Lake's book. After the publication of Lake's book, various Colt revolvers with long (10-inch or 16-inch) barrels were referred to as "Colt Buntlines" or "Buntline Specials". Colt manufactured the pistol among its second generation revolvers produced after 1956. A number of other manufacturers, such as Uberti, Navy Arms, and Cimarron Arms, have made their own version of this long-barreled revolver.


Colt Buntline sections
Intro   Origin    Replicas    References    External links   

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{{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} The Colt Buntline Special is a long-barreled variant of the Colt Single Action Army revolver that author Stuart N. Lake described in his best-selling but largely fictionalized 1931 biography, Wyatt Earp: Frontier Marshal. According to Lake, dime novelist Ned Buntline had five Buntline Specials commissioned. Lake described them as extra-long, {{safesubst:#invoke:convert|convert}}-long barrel Colt Single Action Army revolvers. Lake wrote that Buntline presented them to five lawmen in thanks for their help with contributing “local color” to his western yarns. But modern researchers have not found any evidence to confirm that Buntline ordered the guns or that Colt manufactured them in that time period.

Lake attributed the gun to Earp, but modern researchers have not found any supporting evidence from secondary sources or in available primary documentation of the gun's existence prior to the publication of Lake's book. After the publication of Lake's book, various Colt revolvers with long (10-inch or 16-inch) barrels were referred to as "Colt Buntlines" or "Buntline Specials". Colt manufactured the pistol among its second generation revolvers produced after 1956. A number of other manufacturers, such as Uberti, Navy Arms, and Cimarron Arms, have made their own version of this long-barreled revolver.


Colt Buntline sections
Intro   Origin    Replicas    References    External links   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Origin
<<>>