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{{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} The 1856 Last Island hurricane (also known as the Great Storm of 1856) was one of the deadliest tropical cyclones recorded for Louisiana. The first known tropical cyclone of the season, it was observed first as a minimal hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico near Dry Tortugas on August 9.

Offshore, at least 183 people drowned after steamers and schooners sank in rough seas produced by the hurricane. A storm surge between {{safesubst:#invoke:convert|convert}} completely submerged the island, destroying virtually every structure, including the hotels and casinos, while all crops were ruined. Additionally, Last Island itself was split in two.

Inland, heavy rainfall caused the Mermentau River to flood, destroying crops and every house in Abbeville. The storm produced as much as {{safesubst:#invoke:convert|convert}} of precipitation in New Orleans. In Plaquemines Parish, rice fields were under several feet of water, while many orange trees lost their fruit. The storm resulted in at least 200 fatalities.


1856 Last Island hurricane sections
Intro  Meteorological history  Impact and aftermath  In print   Bibliography    See also   References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Meteorological history
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{{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} The 1856 Last Island hurricane (also known as the Great Storm of 1856) was one of the deadliest tropical cyclones recorded for Louisiana. The first known tropical cyclone of the season, it was observed first as a minimal hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico near Dry Tortugas on August 9.

Offshore, at least 183 people drowned after steamers and schooners sank in rough seas produced by the hurricane. A storm surge between {{safesubst:#invoke:convert|convert}} completely submerged the island, destroying virtually every structure, including the hotels and casinos, while all crops were ruined. Additionally, Last Island itself was split in two.

Inland, heavy rainfall caused the Mermentau River to flood, destroying crops and every house in Abbeville. The storm produced as much as {{safesubst:#invoke:convert|convert}} of precipitation in New Orleans. In Plaquemines Parish, rice fields were under several feet of water, while many orange trees lost their fruit. The storm resulted in at least 200 fatalities.


1856 Last Island hurricane sections
Intro  Meteorological history  Impact and aftermath  In print   Bibliography    See also   References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Meteorological history
<<>>