::German revolutions of 1848–49

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Origin of the Flag of Germany: Cheering revolutionaries in Berlin, on March 19, 1848

The revolutions of 1848–49 in the German states, the opening phase of which was also called the March Revolution (German: Märzrevolution{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}), were initially part of the Revolutions of 1848 that broke out in many European countries. They were a series of loosely coordinated protests and rebellions in the states of the German Confederation, including the Austrian Empire. The revolutions, which stressed pan-Germanism, demonstrated popular discontent with the traditional, largely autocratic political structure of the thirty-nine independent states of the Confederation that inherited the German territory of the former Holy Roman Empire. They demonstrated the popular desire for the Zollverein movement.

The middle-class elements were committed to liberal principles, while the working class sought radical improvements to their working and living conditions. As the middle class and working class components of the Revolution split, the conservative aristocracy defeated it. Liberals were forced into exile to escape political persecution, where they became known as Forty-Eighters. Many immigrated to the United States, settling from Wisconsin to Texas.


German revolutions of 1848–49 sections
Intro  Events leading up to the revolutions  Baden  The Palatinate  Prussia  Saxony  The Rhineland or Rhenish Prussia  Bavaria  Greater Poland  National Assembly in Frankfurt  Backlash in Prussia  Failure of the revolution  In popular culture  References  External links and references  

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Origin of the Flag of Germany: Cheering revolutionaries in Berlin, on March 19, 1848

The revolutions of 1848–49 in the German states, the opening phase of which was also called the March Revolution (German: Märzrevolution{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}), were initially part of the Revolutions of 1848 that broke out in many European countries. They were a series of loosely coordinated protests and rebellions in the states of the German Confederation, including the Austrian Empire. The revolutions, which stressed pan-Germanism, demonstrated popular discontent with the traditional, largely autocratic political structure of the thirty-nine independent states of the Confederation that inherited the German territory of the former Holy Roman Empire. They demonstrated the popular desire for the Zollverein movement.

The middle-class elements were committed to liberal principles, while the working class sought radical improvements to their working and living conditions. As the middle class and working class components of the Revolution split, the conservative aristocracy defeated it. Liberals were forced into exile to escape political persecution, where they became known as Forty-Eighters. Many immigrated to the United States, settling from Wisconsin to Texas.


German revolutions of 1848–49 sections
Intro  Events leading up to the revolutions  Baden  The Palatinate  Prussia  Saxony  The Rhineland or Rhenish Prussia  Bavaria  Greater Poland  National Assembly in Frankfurt  Backlash in Prussia  Failure of the revolution  In popular culture  References  External links and references  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Events leading up to the revolutions
<<>>