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A modern redrawing of the 1807 version of the Commissioner's Grid plan for Manhattan, a few years before it was adopted in 1811

The Commissioners' Plan of 1811 was the original design plan for the streets of Manhattan, which put in place the grid plan that has defined Manhattan to this day. It has been called "the single most important document in New York City's development,"<ref name=manhmaps>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }} pp.100-106</ref> and the plan has been described as encompassing the "republican predilection for control and balance ... [and] distrust of nature."<ref name=gotham /> It was described by the commission that created it as combining "beauty, order and convenience."<ref name=gotham />

The plan originated as a proposal by the New York State Legislature, adopted in 1811 for the orderly development and sale of the land of Manhattan between 14th Street and Washington Heights. The plan is arguably the most famous use of the grid plan and is considered by most historians to have been far-reaching and visionary. Since its earliest days, the plan has been criticized for its monotony and rigidity, in comparison with irregular street patterns of older cities, but in recent years has been viewed more favorably by urban planning critics.<ref name="Times2005">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>

Central Park, the massive urban greenspace in Manhattan running from Fifth Avenue to Eighth Avenue and from 59th Street to 110th Street, is not a part of this plan, as Central Park was not envisioned until 1853. There were a few smaller interruptions in the grid, such as the Grand Parade between 23rd Street and 33rd Street, which was the precursor to Madison Square Park as well as four squares named Harlem, Hamilton, Bloomingdale and Manhattan.<ref name=gotham />


Commissioners' Plan of 1811 sections
Intro  Origins  The plan  Extensions and modifications  Reaction  See also  References  External links  

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A modern redrawing of the 1807 version of the Commissioner's Grid plan for Manhattan, a few years before it was adopted in 1811

The Commissioners' Plan of 1811 was the original design plan for the streets of Manhattan, which put in place the grid plan that has defined Manhattan to this day. It has been called "the single most important document in New York City's development,"<ref name=manhmaps>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }} pp.100-106</ref> and the plan has been described as encompassing the "republican predilection for control and balance ... [and] distrust of nature."<ref name=gotham /> It was described by the commission that created it as combining "beauty, order and convenience."<ref name=gotham />

The plan originated as a proposal by the New York State Legislature, adopted in 1811 for the orderly development and sale of the land of Manhattan between 14th Street and Washington Heights. The plan is arguably the most famous use of the grid plan and is considered by most historians to have been far-reaching and visionary. Since its earliest days, the plan has been criticized for its monotony and rigidity, in comparison with irregular street patterns of older cities, but in recent years has been viewed more favorably by urban planning critics.<ref name="Times2005">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>

Central Park, the massive urban greenspace in Manhattan running from Fifth Avenue to Eighth Avenue and from 59th Street to 110th Street, is not a part of this plan, as Central Park was not envisioned until 1853. There were a few smaller interruptions in the grid, such as the Grand Parade between 23rd Street and 33rd Street, which was the precursor to Madison Square Park as well as four squares named Harlem, Hamilton, Bloomingdale and Manhattan.<ref name=gotham />


Commissioners' Plan of 1811 sections
Intro  Origins  The plan  Extensions and modifications  Reaction  See also  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Origins
<<>>