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::Windows Registry

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The Windows Registry is a hierarchical database that stores low-level settings for the Microsoft Windows operating system and for applications that opt to use the Registry. The kernel, device drivers, services, Security Accounts Manager (SAM), and user interface can all use the Registry. The Registry also allows access to counters for profiling system performance.

When introduced with Windows 3.1, the Windows Registry primarily stored configuration information for COM-based components. Windows 95 and Windows NT extended its use to rationalise and centralise the information in the profusion of INI files, which held the configurations for individual programs, and were stored at various locations. <ref name="Reghist">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref name="SystemRegistry">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> It is not a requirement for a Windows applications to use the Windows Registry. For example, .NET Framework applications use XML files for configuration, while portable applications usually keep their configuration files with their executable.


Windows Registry sections
Intro   Rationale    Structure    Editing    File locations    Security    Backups and recovery    Policy    Virtualization    Disadvantages    Equivalents and alternatives    See also    Notes    Footnotes    References    External links   

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Registry::windows    System::files    Which::stored    Title::value    Value::values    Settings::machine

{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Lead too short |date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Message box|ambox}} }}

The Windows Registry is a hierarchical database that stores low-level settings for the Microsoft Windows operating system and for applications that opt to use the Registry. The kernel, device drivers, services, Security Accounts Manager (SAM), and user interface can all use the Registry. The Registry also allows access to counters for profiling system performance.

When introduced with Windows 3.1, the Windows Registry primarily stored configuration information for COM-based components. Windows 95 and Windows NT extended its use to rationalise and centralise the information in the profusion of INI files, which held the configurations for individual programs, and were stored at various locations. <ref name="Reghist">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref name="SystemRegistry">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> It is not a requirement for a Windows applications to use the Windows Registry. For example, .NET Framework applications use XML files for configuration, while portable applications usually keep their configuration files with their executable.


Windows Registry sections
Intro   Rationale    Structure    Editing    File locations    Security    Backups and recovery    Policy    Virtualization    Disadvantages    Equivalents and alternatives    See also    Notes    Footnotes    References    External links   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Rationale
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