::Ordinal indicator

::concepts



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In written languages, an ordinal indicator is a character, or group of characters, following a numeral denoting that it is an ordinal number, rather than a cardinal number.

In English orthography, this corresponds to the suffixes -st, -nd, -rd, -th in written ordinals (represented either on the line 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th or as superscript, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th).

Also commonly encountered are the superscript (and often underlined) ordinal indicaters a and o, originally from Romance, but via the cultural influence of Italian by the 18th century widely used in the wider cultural sphere of Western Europe, as in 1º primo and 1ª prima "first, chief; prime quality".

The practice of underlined (or doubly underlined) superscripted abbreviations was common in 19th-century writing (not limited to ordinal indicators in particular, and also extant in the Numero sign №), and was also found in handwritten English until at least the late 19th century (e.g. "first" abbreviated 1st or 1).<ref>see Max Harold Fisch, Christian J. W. Kloesel, "Essay on the Editorial Method", in Writings of Charles S. Peirce: 1879-1884, vol. 4 (1989), p. 629: "Peirce also regularly used the nineteenth-century calligraphic convention of double underlining superscript portions of abbreviations such as M or 1."</ref>


Ordinal indicator sections
Intro  Superscript o and a  Other suffixes  Representation as period  Representation as prefix  See also  References  External links  

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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}}

In written languages, an ordinal indicator is a character, or group of characters, following a numeral denoting that it is an ordinal number, rather than a cardinal number.

In English orthography, this corresponds to the suffixes -st, -nd, -rd, -th in written ordinals (represented either on the line 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th or as superscript, 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th).

Also commonly encountered are the superscript (and often underlined) ordinal indicaters a and o, originally from Romance, but via the cultural influence of Italian by the 18th century widely used in the wider cultural sphere of Western Europe, as in 1º primo and 1ª prima "first, chief; prime quality".

The practice of underlined (or doubly underlined) superscripted abbreviations was common in 19th-century writing (not limited to ordinal indicators in particular, and also extant in the Numero sign №), and was also found in handwritten English until at least the late 19th century (e.g. "first" abbreviated 1st or 1).<ref>see Max Harold Fisch, Christian J. W. Kloesel, "Essay on the Editorial Method", in Writings of Charles S. Peirce: 1879-1884, vol. 4 (1989), p. 629: "Peirce also regularly used the nineteenth-century calligraphic convention of double underlining superscript portions of abbreviations such as M or 1."</ref>


Ordinal indicator sections
Intro  Superscript o and a  Other suffixes  Representation as period  Representation as prefix  See also  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Superscript o and a
<<>>