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{{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} (163693) Atira (previously named 2003 CP20), was the first asteroid known to have an orbit entirely within that of Earth.<ref name=jpldata/> It was discovered on February 11, 2003, by the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research project's station at Socorro, New Mexico.<ref name="MPC"/> Together with 2004 JG6, and 2007 EB26, both of which have even smaller orbits, forms a new subclass of Aten asteroids. Following tradition, the new subclass is named after the first known object in that class, and therefore is known as Atiras.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>


163693 Atira sections
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Atira::asteroid    Jpldata::title    Earth::known    Asteroid::goddess    First::names    Given::named

{{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} (163693) Atira (previously named 2003 CP20), was the first asteroid known to have an orbit entirely within that of Earth.<ref name=jpldata/> It was discovered on February 11, 2003, by the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research project's station at Socorro, New Mexico.<ref name="MPC"/> Together with 2004 JG6, and 2007 EB26, both of which have even smaller orbits, forms a new subclass of Aten asteroids. Following tradition, the new subclass is named after the first known object in that class, and therefore is known as Atiras.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>


163693 Atira sections
Intro  Overview   References    External links   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Overview
<<>>