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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}}

Asterisks used to illustrate a section break in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

An asterisk (*; Late Latin: asteriscus{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, from Greek: ἀστερίσκος{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, asteriskos, "little star")<ref>ἀστερίσκος, Henry George Liddell, Robert Scott, A Greek-English Lexicon, on Perseus</ref> is a typographical symbol or glyph. It is so called because it resembles a conventional image of a star. Computer scientists and mathematicians often vocalize it as star (as, for example, in the A* search algorithm or C*-algebra). In English, an asterisk is usually five-pointed in sans-serif typefaces, six-pointed in serif typefaces,{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[citation needed] }} and six- or eight-pointed when handwritten. It can be used as censorship. It is also used on the internet to correct one's spelling, in which case it appears after the correct word.

The asterisk is derived from the need of the printers of family trees in feudal times for a symbol to indicate date of birth. The original shape was seven-armed,{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[citation needed] }} each arm like a teardrop shooting from the center.

In computer science, the asterisk is commonly used as a wildcard character, or to denote pointers, repetition, or multiplication.


Asterisk sections
Intro  Usage  Encodings  See also  References  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Usage
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Style::asterisk    Asterisk::language    Spoked::unicode    Class::heavy    Denote::example    Padding::called

{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}}

Asterisks used to illustrate a section break in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

An asterisk (*; Late Latin: asteriscus{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, from Greek: ἀστερίσκος{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, asteriskos, "little star")<ref>ἀστερίσκος, Henry George Liddell, Robert Scott, A Greek-English Lexicon, on Perseus</ref> is a typographical symbol or glyph. It is so called because it resembles a conventional image of a star. Computer scientists and mathematicians often vocalize it as star (as, for example, in the A* search algorithm or C*-algebra). In English, an asterisk is usually five-pointed in sans-serif typefaces, six-pointed in serif typefaces,{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[citation needed] }} and six- or eight-pointed when handwritten. It can be used as censorship. It is also used on the internet to correct one's spelling, in which case it appears after the correct word.

The asterisk is derived from the need of the printers of family trees in feudal times for a symbol to indicate date of birth. The original shape was seven-armed,{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[citation needed] }} each arm like a teardrop shooting from the center.

In computer science, the asterisk is commonly used as a wildcard character, or to denote pointers, repetition, or multiplication.


Asterisk sections
Intro  Usage  Encodings  See also  References  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Usage
<<>>