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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} The ukulele ({{#invoke:IPAc-en|main}} ew-kə-LAY-lee, from Hawaiian: {{#invoke:Category handler|main}} [ˈʔukuˈlɛlɛ]; British English: ukelele)<ref></ref> sometimes abbreviated to uke, is a member of the lute family of instruments; it generally employs four nylon or gut strings or four courses of strings.<ref>Erich M. von Hornbostel & Curt Sachs, "Classification of Musical Instruments: Translated from the Original German by Anthony Baines and Klaus P. Wachsmann." The Galpin Society Journal 14, 1961: 3-29.</ref>

The ukulele originated in the 19th century as a Hawaiian adaptation of the Portuguese machete,<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> a small guitar-like instrument, which was introduced to Hawaii by Portuguese immigrants, many from the Macaronesian Islands. It gained great popularity elsewhere in the United States during the early 20th century, and from there spread internationally.

The tone and volume of the instrument varies with size and construction. Ukuleles commonly come in four sizes: soprano, concert, tenor, and baritone.


Ukulele sections
Intro  History  Types  Related instruments  Audio samples  See also  Notes  References  References   External links   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: History
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Define::ukulele    Ukulele::tuning    Title::first    Music::hawaiian    Ukuleles::string    Soprano::hawaii

{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}} The ukulele ({{#invoke:IPAc-en|main}} ew-kə-LAY-lee, from Hawaiian: {{#invoke:Category handler|main}} [ˈʔukuˈlɛlɛ]; British English: ukelele)<ref></ref> sometimes abbreviated to uke, is a member of the lute family of instruments; it generally employs four nylon or gut strings or four courses of strings.<ref>Erich M. von Hornbostel & Curt Sachs, "Classification of Musical Instruments: Translated from the Original German by Anthony Baines and Klaus P. Wachsmann." The Galpin Society Journal 14, 1961: 3-29.</ref>

The ukulele originated in the 19th century as a Hawaiian adaptation of the Portuguese machete,<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> a small guitar-like instrument, which was introduced to Hawaii by Portuguese immigrants, many from the Macaronesian Islands. It gained great popularity elsewhere in the United States during the early 20th century, and from there spread internationally.

The tone and volume of the instrument varies with size and construction. Ukuleles commonly come in four sizes: soprano, concert, tenor, and baritone.


Ukulele sections
Intro  History  Types  Related instruments  Audio samples  See also  Notes  References  References   External links   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: History
<<>>