Actions

::-logy

::concepts



{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{#invoke:redirect hatnote|redirect}}

-logy is a suffix in the English language, used with words originally adapted from Ancient Greek ending in -λογία{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} (-logia).<ref>List of ancient Greek words ending in -λογία on Perseus</ref> The earliest English examples were anglicizations of the French -logie, which was in turn inherited from the Latin -logia.<ref>"-logy." The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004. retrieved 20 Aug. 2008.</ref> The suffix became productive in English from the 18th century, allowing the formation of new terms with no Latin or Greek precedent.

The English suffix has two separate main senses, reflecting two sources of the -λογία{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} suffix in Greek:<ref>"-logy." Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Random House, Inc. retrieved 20 Aug. 2008.</ref>

  • a combining form used in the names of sciences or bodies of knowledge, e.g. theology (loaned from Latin in the 14th century) or sociology. In words of the type theology, the suffix is derived originally from -λογ-{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} (-log-) (a variant of -λεγ-{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, -leg-), from the Greek verb λέγειν{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} (legein, "to speak").<ref name="English Etymology 1986">"-logy." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. Oxford University Press, 1986. retrieved 20 August 2008.</ref> The suffix has the sense of "the character or deportment of one who speaks or treats of [a certain subject]", or more succinctly, "the study of [a certain subject]".<ref>"-logy." Online Etymology Dictionary. retrieved 20 Aug. 2008</ref>
  • the root word nouns that refer to kinds of speech, writing or collections of writing, e.g. eulogy or trilogy. In words of this type, the "-logy" element is derived from the Greek noun λόγος{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} (logos, "speech", "account", "story").<ref name="English Etymology 1986"/> The suffix has the sense of "[a certain kind of] speaking or writing".<ref name="The Oxford English Dictionary 1989">"-logy." The Oxford English Dictionary, Second Edition. Oxford University Press, 1989. retrieved 20 August 2008.</ref>

Philology is an exception: while its meaning is closer to the first sense, the etymology of the word is similar to the second sense.<ref>"Philology." Online Etymology Dictionary. retrieved 14 Jul. 2011</ref>


-logy sections
Intro  -logy versus -ology  Additional usage as a suffix  See also  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: -logy versus -ology
<<>>

English::-logy    Suffix::greek    Study::words    Ologies::oxford    Latin::subject    Ending::sense

{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{#invoke:redirect hatnote|redirect}}

-logy is a suffix in the English language, used with words originally adapted from Ancient Greek ending in -λογία{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} (-logia).<ref>List of ancient Greek words ending in -λογία on Perseus</ref> The earliest English examples were anglicizations of the French -logie, which was in turn inherited from the Latin -logia.<ref>"-logy." The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004. retrieved 20 Aug. 2008.</ref> The suffix became productive in English from the 18th century, allowing the formation of new terms with no Latin or Greek precedent.

The English suffix has two separate main senses, reflecting two sources of the -λογία{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} suffix in Greek:<ref>"-logy." Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1). Random House, Inc. retrieved 20 Aug. 2008.</ref>

  • a combining form used in the names of sciences or bodies of knowledge, e.g. theology (loaned from Latin in the 14th century) or sociology. In words of the type theology, the suffix is derived originally from -λογ-{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} (-log-) (a variant of -λεγ-{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, -leg-), from the Greek verb λέγειν{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} (legein, "to speak").<ref name="English Etymology 1986">"-logy." The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Etymology. Oxford University Press, 1986. retrieved 20 August 2008.</ref> The suffix has the sense of "the character or deportment of one who speaks or treats of [a certain subject]", or more succinctly, "the study of [a certain subject]".<ref>"-logy." Online Etymology Dictionary. retrieved 20 Aug. 2008</ref>
  • the root word nouns that refer to kinds of speech, writing or collections of writing, e.g. eulogy or trilogy. In words of this type, the "-logy" element is derived from the Greek noun λόγος{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} (logos, "speech", "account", "story").<ref name="English Etymology 1986"/> The suffix has the sense of "[a certain kind of] speaking or writing".<ref name="The Oxford English Dictionary 1989">"-logy." The Oxford English Dictionary, Second Edition. Oxford University Press, 1989. retrieved 20 August 2008.</ref>

Philology is an exception: while its meaning is closer to the first sense, the etymology of the word is similar to the second sense.<ref>"Philology." Online Etymology Dictionary. retrieved 14 Jul. 2011</ref>


-logy sections
Intro  -logy versus -ology  Additional usage as a suffix  See also  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: -logy versus -ology
<<>>