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Common type of ʻie toga with a coarse weave sold at a market in Sāmoa.

A ʻie tōga is a special finely woven mat that is the most important item of cultural value in Sāmoa. They are commonly referred to in English as "fine mats" although they are never used as 'mats'<ref name=mm>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> as they only have a purely cultural value. ʻIe tōga are valued by the quality of the weave and the softness and shine of the material. They are made by women and form an important part of their role, identity and skill in their community.<ref name=pfd>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref>

ʻIe tōga have an unwoven fringe and a strip of red feathers. They are important in gift exchanges during cultural ceremonies and events including matai chief title bestowals, weddings and funerals. In this way, ʻie tōga are passed from family to family, sometimes for many years and are greatly valued. Historically, some ʻie tōga were so valuable they were given their own names. The process of making a fine ʻie tōga can take months of work and have been known to take years. The completion of ʻie tōga can involve a public celebration and presentation with the women parading and displaying their fine mats for all to see.<ref name=pfd/>


‘ie toga sections
Intro  Cultural value  Process  Etymology  See also  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Cultural value
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Samoa::their    Women::samoan    Tongan::given    Family::result    Books::language    Leaves::value

Common type of ʻie toga with a coarse weave sold at a market in Sāmoa.

A ʻie tōga is a special finely woven mat that is the most important item of cultural value in Sāmoa. They are commonly referred to in English as "fine mats" although they are never used as 'mats'<ref name=mm>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> as they only have a purely cultural value. ʻIe tōga are valued by the quality of the weave and the softness and shine of the material. They are made by women and form an important part of their role, identity and skill in their community.<ref name=pfd>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref>

ʻIe tōga have an unwoven fringe and a strip of red feathers. They are important in gift exchanges during cultural ceremonies and events including matai chief title bestowals, weddings and funerals. In this way, ʻie tōga are passed from family to family, sometimes for many years and are greatly valued. Historically, some ʻie tōga were so valuable they were given their own names. The process of making a fine ʻie tōga can take months of work and have been known to take years. The completion of ʻie tōga can involve a public celebration and presentation with the women parading and displaying their fine mats for all to see.<ref name=pfd/>


‘ie toga sections
Intro  Cultural value  Process  Etymology  See also  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Cultural value
<<>>