Actions

::Ilm al-Kalam

::concepts



{{#invoke:redirect hatnote|redirect}}

ʿIlm al-Kalām (Arabic: علم الكلام‎{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, literally "science of discourse"<ref name="Wolfson">Winter, Tim J. "Introduction." Introduction. The Cambridge Companion to Classical Islamic Theology. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2008. 4-5. Print.</ref>), usually foreshortened to kalam and sometimes called "Islamic scholastic theology", is an Islamic undertaking born out of the need to establish and defend the tenets of Islamic faith against doubters and detractors.<ref>Madeleine Pelner Cosman, Linda Gale Jones, Handbook to Life in the Medieval World, p 391. ISBN 1438109075</ref> A scholar of kalam is referred to as a mutakallim (plural mutakallimūn) as distinguished from philosophers, jurists, and scientists.<ref>Clinton Bennett, The Bloomsbury Companion to Islamic Studies, p 119. ISBN 1441127887.</ref> There are many possible interpretations as to why this discipline was originally called "kalam"; one is that the widest controversy in this discipline has been about whether the Word of God, as revealed in the Qur'an, can be considered part of God's essence and therefore not created, or whether it was made into words in the normal sense of speech, and is therefore created.


Ilm al-Kalam sections
Intro  Terminology  Origins   As an Islamic discipline    Major kalam schools    See also    References    External links   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Terminology
<<>>

Islamic::kalam    Kalam::islam    Muslim::bennett    Scholar::keller    Scholars::theology    Against::words

{{#invoke:redirect hatnote|redirect}}

ʿIlm al-Kalām (Arabic: علم الكلام‎{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, literally "science of discourse"<ref name="Wolfson">Winter, Tim J. "Introduction." Introduction. The Cambridge Companion to Classical Islamic Theology. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2008. 4-5. Print.</ref>), usually foreshortened to kalam and sometimes called "Islamic scholastic theology", is an Islamic undertaking born out of the need to establish and defend the tenets of Islamic faith against doubters and detractors.<ref>Madeleine Pelner Cosman, Linda Gale Jones, Handbook to Life in the Medieval World, p 391. ISBN 1438109075</ref> A scholar of kalam is referred to as a mutakallim (plural mutakallimūn) as distinguished from philosophers, jurists, and scientists.<ref>Clinton Bennett, The Bloomsbury Companion to Islamic Studies, p 119. ISBN 1441127887.</ref> There are many possible interpretations as to why this discipline was originally called "kalam"; one is that the widest controversy in this discipline has been about whether the Word of God, as revealed in the Qur'an, can be considered part of God's essence and therefore not created, or whether it was made into words in the normal sense of speech, and is therefore created.


Ilm al-Kalam sections
Intro  Terminology  Origins   As an Islamic discipline    Major kalam schools    See also    References    External links   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Terminology
<<>>