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The oud ({{#invoke:IPAc-en|main}}; Arabic: عود‎{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} ʿūd  Arabic pronunciation: [ʕu(ː)d, ʢuːd], plural: أعواد{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} aʿwād; Armenian: ուդ{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, Syriac: ܥܘܕ{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} ūd, Greek: ούτι{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} oúti; Hebrew: עוּד‎{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} ud; Persian: بربط‎{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}‎ barbat; Kurdish: ûd‎{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}; Turkish: ud or ut{{#invoke:Category handler|main}};<ref>Güncel Türkçe Sözlük'te Söz Arama (Turkish){{#invoke:Category handler|main}}</ref> Azeri: ud; Somali: cuud{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} or kaban) is a pear-shaped stringed instrument commonly used in Persian،Arabic, Greek, Turkish,Jewish, Byzantine, Azerbaijanian, Armenian, North African (Chaabi, Classical, and Spanish Andalusian), Somali and Middle Eastern music. Construction of the oud is similar to that of the lute.<ref name="mottola-kyvelos">{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> The modern oud and the European lute both descend from a common ancestor via diverging paths. One instrument that has been suggested as ancestral is the Barbat.<ref name=Iranica>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> The oud is readily distinguished from the lute by its lack of frets and smaller neck. Alongside the lute, it is considered an ancestor of the guitar.<ref>Summerfield, Maurice J. (2003). The Classical Guitar, Its Evolution, Players and Personalities Since 1800 (5th ed.) Blaydon on Tyne: Ashley Mark Publishing. ISBN 1-872639-46-1</ref>


Oud sections
Intro  Etymology  History  Types  See also  References  External links  

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Music::turkish    Arabic::category    Musical::music    Style::title    Transl::iranica    String::ankara

{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}}

The oud ({{#invoke:IPAc-en|main}}; Arabic: عود‎{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} ʿūd  Arabic pronunciation: [ʕu(ː)d, ʢuːd], plural: أعواد{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} aʿwād; Armenian: ուդ{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, Syriac: ܥܘܕ{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} ūd, Greek: ούτι{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} oúti; Hebrew: עוּד‎{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} ud; Persian: بربط‎{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}‎ barbat; Kurdish: ûd‎{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}; Turkish: ud or ut{{#invoke:Category handler|main}};<ref>Güncel Türkçe Sözlük'te Söz Arama (Turkish){{#invoke:Category handler|main}}</ref> Azeri: ud; Somali: cuud{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} or kaban) is a pear-shaped stringed instrument commonly used in Persian،Arabic, Greek, Turkish,Jewish, Byzantine, Azerbaijanian, Armenian, North African (Chaabi, Classical, and Spanish Andalusian), Somali and Middle Eastern music. Construction of the oud is similar to that of the lute.<ref name="mottola-kyvelos">{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}</ref> The modern oud and the European lute both descend from a common ancestor via diverging paths. One instrument that has been suggested as ancestral is the Barbat.<ref name=Iranica>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> The oud is readily distinguished from the lute by its lack of frets and smaller neck. Alongside the lute, it is considered an ancestor of the guitar.<ref>Summerfield, Maurice J. (2003). The Classical Guitar, Its Evolution, Players and Personalities Since 1800 (5th ed.) Blaydon on Tyne: Ashley Mark Publishing. ISBN 1-872639-46-1</ref>


Oud sections
Intro  Etymology  History  Types  See also  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Etymology
<<>>