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Umar, also spelled Omar (Arabic: عمر بن الخطاب{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, translit.: `Umar ibn Al-Khattāb, Umar Son of Al-Khattab, born c.583 CE

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{{#invoke:Redirect template|main}}died 3 November 644 CE), was one of the most powerful and influential Muslim caliphs (successors) in history.<ref>Ahmed, Nazeer, Islam in Global History: From the Death of Prophet Muhammad to the First World War, American Institute of Islamic History and Cul, 2001, p. 34. ISBN 0-7388-5963-X.</ref> He was a senior Sahaba of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. He succeeded Abu Bakr (632–634) as the second caliph of the Rashidun Caliphate on 23 August 634. He was an expert Islamic jurist known for his pious and just nature, which earned him the epithet Al-Farooq ("the one who distinguishes between right and wrong"). He is sometimes referred to as Umar I by historians of Islam, since a later Umayyad caliph, Umar II, also bore that name. According to Sunnis, Umar is the second greatest of the Sahaba after Abu Bakr.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>

Under Umar, the caliphate expanded at an unprecedented rate, ruling the Sasanian Empire and more than two-thirds of the Byzantine Empire.<ref>Hourani, p. 23.</ref> His attacks against the Sasanian Empire resulted in the conquest of Persia in fewer than two years (642–644).<ref name="jewishvirtuallibrary.org">https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/History/Caliphate.html</ref> According to Jewish tradition, Umar set aside the Christian ban on Jews and allowed them into Jerusalem and to worship.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref>


Umar sections
Intro  Early life  During Muhammad's era  Foundation of the caliphate  Caliph Abu Bakr's era  Reign as caliph  Political and civil administration   Canals   Reforms  Visit to Jerusalem in 637 CE  Military expansion  The great famine  The great plague  Welfare state   Free trade   Assassination  Western views  Family  See also  Notes  References  External links  

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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}}

Umar, also spelled Omar (Arabic: عمر بن الخطاب{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, translit.: `Umar ibn Al-Khattāb, Umar Son of Al-Khattab, born c.583 CE

  1. REDIRECT

{{#invoke:Redirect template|main}}died 3 November 644 CE), was one of the most powerful and influential Muslim caliphs (successors) in history.<ref>Ahmed, Nazeer, Islam in Global History: From the Death of Prophet Muhammad to the First World War, American Institute of Islamic History and Cul, 2001, p. 34. ISBN 0-7388-5963-X.</ref> He was a senior Sahaba of the Islamic prophet Muhammad. He succeeded Abu Bakr (632–634) as the second caliph of the Rashidun Caliphate on 23 August 634. He was an expert Islamic jurist known for his pious and just nature, which earned him the epithet Al-Farooq ("the one who distinguishes between right and wrong"). He is sometimes referred to as Umar I by historians of Islam, since a later Umayyad caliph, Umar II, also bore that name. According to Sunnis, Umar is the second greatest of the Sahaba after Abu Bakr.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref>

Under Umar, the caliphate expanded at an unprecedented rate, ruling the Sasanian Empire and more than two-thirds of the Byzantine Empire.<ref>Hourani, p. 23.</ref> His attacks against the Sasanian Empire resulted in the conquest of Persia in fewer than two years (642–644).<ref name="jewishvirtuallibrary.org">https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/History/Caliphate.html</ref> According to Jewish tradition, Umar set aside the Christian ban on Jews and allowed them into Jerusalem and to worship.<ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref>


Umar sections
Intro  Early life  During Muhammad's era  Foundation of the caliphate  Caliph Abu Bakr's era  Reign as caliph  Political and civil administration   Canals   Reforms  Visit to Jerusalem in 637 CE  Military expansion  The great famine  The great plague  Welfare state   Free trade   Assassination  Western views  Family  See also  Notes  References  External links  

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