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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=EngvarB |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}}

The Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA or PIRA) was<ref>McConville son says Gerry Adams 'threatened backlash'</ref><ref>IRA has disbanded but army council still exists, peace monitors report</ref><ref>IRA has disbanded terrorist structure, says report</ref><ref>I.R.A. Ex-Commander to Shake Hands With Queen</ref>{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Contradiction-inline |date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[contradiction] }}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[inconsistent] an Irish republican paramilitary organisation that sought to remove Northern Ireland from the United Kingdom and bring about an independent republic encompassing all of Ireland.<ref>Moloney, Ed (2002). A Secret History of the IRA. Penguin Books. p. 246. ISBN 0-14-101041-X.</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> It was the biggest and most active republican paramilitary group during the Troubles. It saw itself as the successor to the original IRA and called itself simply the Irish Republican Army, or Óglaigh na hÉireann in Irish.<ref>Moloney, p. 707</ref> It was also widely referred to as such by others. The IRA is designated an unlawful terrorist organisation in the United Kingdom and an unlawful organisation in the Republic of Ireland.<ref name=uk_illegal>Home Office – Proscribed Terror Groups – Home Office website. Retrieved 11 May 2007</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>

The Provisional IRA emerged in December 1969, following a split in the republican movement. The Troubles had begun a year before, when a largely Catholic, nonviolent civil rights campaign was met with violence from both Ulster loyalists and the Royal Ulster Constabulary, culminating in the August 1969 riots and deployment of British troops.<ref name="The Provisional IRA' p. 117">The Provisional IRA by Patrick Bishop and Eamonn Mallie (ISBN 0-552-13337-X), p. 117.</ref> The IRA initially focused on defence, but it began an offensive campaign in 1971 (see timeline). The IRA's primary goal was to force the British to negotiate a withdrawal from Northern Ireland. It used guerrilla tactics against the British Army and RUC in both rural and urban areas. It also carried out a bombing campaign in Northern Ireland and England against what it saw as political and economic targets. The IRA called a final ceasefire in July 1997, after Sinn Féin was re-admitted into the Northern Ireland peace talks. It supported the 1998 Good Friday Agreement and in 2005 it disarmed under international supervision.


Provisional Irish Republican Army sections
Intro  Overview of strategies  Organisation  History  Weaponry and operations  Other activities  Casualties  Categorisation  Strength and support  Informers  See also  References  External links  

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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=EngvarB |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }} {{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}}

The Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA or PIRA) was<ref>McConville son says Gerry Adams 'threatened backlash'</ref><ref>IRA has disbanded but army council still exists, peace monitors report</ref><ref>IRA has disbanded terrorist structure, says report</ref><ref>I.R.A. Ex-Commander to Shake Hands With Queen</ref>{{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Contradiction-inline |date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[contradiction] }}{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}[inconsistent] an Irish republican paramilitary organisation that sought to remove Northern Ireland from the United Kingdom and bring about an independent republic encompassing all of Ireland.<ref>Moloney, Ed (2002). A Secret History of the IRA. Penguin Books. p. 246. ISBN 0-14-101041-X.</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=book }}</ref> It was the biggest and most active republican paramilitary group during the Troubles. It saw itself as the successor to the original IRA and called itself simply the Irish Republican Army, or Óglaigh na hÉireann in Irish.<ref>Moloney, p. 707</ref> It was also widely referred to as such by others. The IRA is designated an unlawful terrorist organisation in the United Kingdom and an unlawful organisation in the Republic of Ireland.<ref name=uk_illegal>Home Office – Proscribed Terror Groups – Home Office website. Retrieved 11 May 2007</ref><ref>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=news }}</ref>

The Provisional IRA emerged in December 1969, following a split in the republican movement. The Troubles had begun a year before, when a largely Catholic, nonviolent civil rights campaign was met with violence from both Ulster loyalists and the Royal Ulster Constabulary, culminating in the August 1969 riots and deployment of British troops.<ref name="The Provisional IRA' p. 117">The Provisional IRA by Patrick Bishop and Eamonn Mallie (ISBN 0-552-13337-X), p. 117.</ref> The IRA initially focused on defence, but it began an offensive campaign in 1971 (see timeline). The IRA's primary goal was to force the British to negotiate a withdrawal from Northern Ireland. It used guerrilla tactics against the British Army and RUC in both rural and urban areas. It also carried out a bombing campaign in Northern Ireland and England against what it saw as political and economic targets. The IRA called a final ceasefire in July 1997, after Sinn Féin was re-admitted into the Northern Ireland peace talks. It supported the 1998 Good Friday Agreement and in 2005 it disarmed under international supervision.


Provisional Irish Republican Army sections
Intro  Overview of strategies  Organisation  History  Weaponry and operations  Other activities  Casualties  Categorisation  Strength and support  Informers  See also  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Overview of strategies
<<>>