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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}}

An exhibit depicting Exilarch Huna at the Beit Hatefutsot

Exilarch (Hebrew: ראש גלות Rosh Galut, Aramaic: ריש גלותא Reish Galuta lit. "head of the exile", Greek: aechmalotarches / Αἰχμαλωτάρχης - "leader of the captives") refers to the leaders of the Diaspora Jewish community in Babylon following the deportation of King Jeconiah and his court into Babylonian exile after the first fall of Jerusalem in 597 BCE and augmented after the further deportations following the destruction of the kingdom of Judah in 587 BCE. The people in exile were called golah (, 29:1) or galut ().

The Greek term has continued to be applied to the position, notwithstanding changes to the position over time, which was at most times purely honorific. The origin of this dignity is not known, but the princely post was hereditary in a family that traced its descent from the royal Davidic line. It was recognized by the state and carried with it certain prerogatives. The first historical documents referring to it date from the time when Babylon was part of the Parthian Empire. The office lasted to the middle of the 6th century, under different regimes (the Arsacids and Sassanids). During the end of 5th century and the beginning of 6th century Mar-Zutra II formed a politically independent state where he ruled from Mahoza for about seven years. He was eventually defeated by Kavadh I, King of Persia.<ref>http://jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=171&letter=Z&search=Mar%20zutra</ref> The position was restored in the 7th century, under Arab rule. Exilarchs continued to be appointed through the 11th century. Under Arab rule, Muslims treated the exilarch with great pomp and circumstance.


Exilarch sections
Intro  Development and organization  Holders of the office  Character of the exilarchate in the first era  Character of the exilarchate in the Arabic era  References  External links  

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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}}

An exhibit depicting Exilarch Huna at the Beit Hatefutsot

Exilarch (Hebrew: ראש גלות Rosh Galut, Aramaic: ריש גלותא Reish Galuta lit. "head of the exile", Greek: aechmalotarches / Αἰχμαλωτάρχης - "leader of the captives") refers to the leaders of the Diaspora Jewish community in Babylon following the deportation of King Jeconiah and his court into Babylonian exile after the first fall of Jerusalem in 597 BCE and augmented after the further deportations following the destruction of the kingdom of Judah in 587 BCE. The people in exile were called golah (, 29:1) or galut ().

The Greek term has continued to be applied to the position, notwithstanding changes to the position over time, which was at most times purely honorific. The origin of this dignity is not known, but the princely post was hereditary in a family that traced its descent from the royal Davidic line. It was recognized by the state and carried with it certain prerogatives. The first historical documents referring to it date from the time when Babylon was part of the Parthian Empire. The office lasted to the middle of the 6th century, under different regimes (the Arsacids and Sassanids). During the end of 5th century and the beginning of 6th century Mar-Zutra II formed a politically independent state where he ruled from Mahoza for about seven years. He was eventually defeated by Kavadh I, King of Persia.<ref>http://jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=171&letter=Z&search=Mar%20zutra</ref> The position was restored in the 7th century, under Arab rule. Exilarchs continued to be appointed through the 11th century. Under Arab rule, Muslims treated the exilarch with great pomp and circumstance.


Exilarch sections
Intro  Development and organization  Holders of the office  Character of the exilarchate in the first era  Character of the exilarchate in the Arabic era  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Development and organization
<<>>