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::Soft light

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Natural soft lighting from a sunrise in Temanggung Regency, Central Java, Indonesia
Artificial soft light from a beauty dish is used in this cosplay portrait of Princess Zelda

Soft light refers to light that tends to "wrap" around objects, casting diffuse shadows with soft edges. Soft light is when a light source is large relative to the subject, hard light is when the light source is small relative to the subject.

This depends mostly on the following two factors:

  • Distance. The closer the light source, the softer it becomes.
  • Size of light source. The larger the source, the softer it becomes.

The softness of a light source can also be determined by the angle between the illuminated object and the 'length' of the light source (the longest dimension that is perpendicular to the object being lit). The larger this angle is, the softer the light source.


Soft light sections
Intro  Uses of soft light  Hard light  Fall-off  Softness/hardness of various light sources  See also  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Uses of soft light
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Light::source    Shadows::lighting    Sources::distance    Large::light    Object::subject    Tends::shadow

{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Refimprove |date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Message box|ambox}} }}

Natural soft lighting from a sunrise in Temanggung Regency, Central Java, Indonesia
Artificial soft light from a beauty dish is used in this cosplay portrait of Princess Zelda

Soft light refers to light that tends to "wrap" around objects, casting diffuse shadows with soft edges. Soft light is when a light source is large relative to the subject, hard light is when the light source is small relative to the subject.

This depends mostly on the following two factors:

  • Distance. The closer the light source, the softer it becomes.
  • Size of light source. The larger the source, the softer it becomes.

The softness of a light source can also be determined by the angle between the illuminated object and the 'length' of the light source (the longest dimension that is perpendicular to the object being lit). The larger this angle is, the softer the light source.


Soft light sections
Intro  Uses of soft light  Hard light  Fall-off  Softness/hardness of various light sources  See also  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Uses of soft light
<<>>