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Site traditionally described as the tomb of Ezra at Al-Uzayr near Basra, Iraq.

Ezra ({{#invoke:IPAc-en|main}}; Hebrew: עזרא‎{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, Ezra;<ref>"God helps" — Emil G. Hirsch, Isaac Broydé, "Ezra the Scribe", Jewish Encyclopedia (Online)</ref> fl. 480–440 BC), also called Ezra the Scribe (עזרא הסופר{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, Ezra ha-Sofer) and Ezra the Priest in the Book of Ezra, was a Jewish scribe and a priest. According to the Hebrew Bible he returned from the Babylonian exile and reintroduced the Torah in Jerusalem (Ezra 7–10 and Neh 8). According to 1 Esdras, a Greek translation of the Book of Ezra still in use in Eastern Orthodoxy, he was also a high priest.

Several traditions have developed over his place of burial. One tradition says that he is buried in al-Uzayr near Basra (Iraq), while another tradition alleges that he is buried in Tadif near Aleppo, in northern Syria.<ref>Tawil, Hayim & Schneider, Bernard 2010, Crown of Aleppo: The Mystery of the Oldest Hebrew Bible Codex, Philadelphia, Jewish Publication Society 2010, p. 63 ISBN 9780827608955; Laniado, David, Li-Qedošim ašer ba-areṣ, Jerusalem 1980, p. 26 (Hebrew); Frenkel, Miriam, article: Atare pulḥan yehudiyyim be-ḥalab bi-yme ha-benayim ha-tikhoniyyim, published in: Harel (הראל), Yaron, Assis, Yom Ṭov & Frenkel, Miriam (eds.), Ereṣ u-mlo’ah: meḥqarim be-toledot qehillat aram ṣova (ḥalab) ve-tarbutah, vol. I, Ben-Zvi Institute: Jerusalem 2009, pp. 174 – 175 (Hebrew); Khatib, Muḥammad Zuhair, Rabṭ al-Sabāba al-yamanī.</ref>

His name may be an abbreviation of עזריהו Azaryahu, "God-helps". In the Greek Septuagint the name is rendered Ésdrās (Ἔσδρας{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}), from which the Latin name Esdras{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} comes.

The Book of Ezra describes how he led a group of Judean exiles living in Babylon to their home city of Jerusalem (Ezra 8.2-14) where he is said to have enforced observance of the Torah. He also is credited with exhorting the community about intermarriage of different faiths because the Jewish men were actively marrying pagan women.<ref name="BrillPauly">Liwak, Rüdiger; Schwemer, Anna Maria "Ezra." Brill's New Pauly.</ref><ref name="Britannica">Ezra." Encyclopædia Britannica.2007. Encyclopædia Britannica Online.</ref>

Ezra, known as "Ezra the scribe" in Chazalic literature,<ref>Edward Kessler, Neil Wenborn, A Dictionary of Jewish-Christian Relations, Cambridge University Press, p.398</ref> is a highly respected figure in Judaism.<ref>The New Encyclopedia of Judaism, Ezra</ref>


Ezra sections
Intro  In the Hebrew Bible  In later Second Temple period literature  Ezra in rabbinic literature  Ezra in Christian traditions  Ezra in Islam  [[Ezra?section=</a>_Academic_view_|</a> Academic view ]]  See also   References   Further reading   External links   

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{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Use dmy dates |date=__DATE__ |$B= }}

Site traditionally described as the tomb of Ezra at Al-Uzayr near Basra, Iraq.

Ezra ({{#invoke:IPAc-en|main}}; Hebrew: עזרא‎{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, Ezra;<ref>"God helps" — Emil G. Hirsch, Isaac Broydé, "Ezra the Scribe", Jewish Encyclopedia (Online)</ref> fl. 480–440 BC), also called Ezra the Scribe (עזרא הסופר{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, Ezra ha-Sofer) and Ezra the Priest in the Book of Ezra, was a Jewish scribe and a priest. According to the Hebrew Bible he returned from the Babylonian exile and reintroduced the Torah in Jerusalem (Ezra 7–10 and Neh 8). According to 1 Esdras, a Greek translation of the Book of Ezra still in use in Eastern Orthodoxy, he was also a high priest.

Several traditions have developed over his place of burial. One tradition says that he is buried in al-Uzayr near Basra (Iraq), while another tradition alleges that he is buried in Tadif near Aleppo, in northern Syria.<ref>Tawil, Hayim & Schneider, Bernard 2010, Crown of Aleppo: The Mystery of the Oldest Hebrew Bible Codex, Philadelphia, Jewish Publication Society 2010, p. 63 ISBN 9780827608955; Laniado, David, Li-Qedošim ašer ba-areṣ, Jerusalem 1980, p. 26 (Hebrew); Frenkel, Miriam, article: Atare pulḥan yehudiyyim be-ḥalab bi-yme ha-benayim ha-tikhoniyyim, published in: Harel (הראל), Yaron, Assis, Yom Ṭov & Frenkel, Miriam (eds.), Ereṣ u-mlo’ah: meḥqarim be-toledot qehillat aram ṣova (ḥalab) ve-tarbutah, vol. I, Ben-Zvi Institute: Jerusalem 2009, pp. 174 – 175 (Hebrew); Khatib, Muḥammad Zuhair, Rabṭ al-Sabāba al-yamanī.</ref>

His name may be an abbreviation of עזריהו Azaryahu, "God-helps". In the Greek Septuagint the name is rendered Ésdrās (Ἔσδρας{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}), from which the Latin name Esdras{{#invoke:Category handler|main}} comes.

The Book of Ezra describes how he led a group of Judean exiles living in Babylon to their home city of Jerusalem (Ezra 8.2-14) where he is said to have enforced observance of the Torah. He also is credited with exhorting the community about intermarriage of different faiths because the Jewish men were actively marrying pagan women.<ref name="BrillPauly">Liwak, Rüdiger; Schwemer, Anna Maria "Ezra." Brill's New Pauly.</ref><ref name="Britannica">Ezra." Encyclopædia Britannica.2007. Encyclopædia Britannica Online.</ref>

Ezra, known as "Ezra the scribe" in Chazalic literature,<ref>Edward Kessler, Neil Wenborn, A Dictionary of Jewish-Christian Relations, Cambridge University Press, p.398</ref> is a highly respected figure in Judaism.<ref>The New Encyclopedia of Judaism, Ezra</ref>


Ezra sections
Intro  In the Hebrew Bible  In later Second Temple period literature  Ezra in rabbinic literature  Ezra in Christian traditions  Ezra in Islam  [[Ezra?section=</a>_Academic_view_|</a> Academic view ]]  See also   References   Further reading   External links   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: In the Hebrew Bible
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