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Preparation of an eruv between Oz Zion and Giv'at Asaf.

An eruv ([ʔeˈʁuv]; Hebrew: עירוב‎{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, "mixture", also transliterated as eiruv or erub, plural: eruvin [ʔeʁuˈvin]) is a ritual enclosure that some communities construct in their neighborhoods as a way to permit Jewish residents or visitors to carry certain objects outside their own homes on Sabbath and Yom Kippur. An eruv accomplishes this by integrating a number of private and public properties into one larger private domain, thereby countermanding restrictions on carrying objects from the private to the public domain on Sabbath and holidays.

The eruv allows these religious Jews to, among other things, carry house keys, tissues, medicines, or babies with them, and use strollers and canes. The presence or absence of an eruv thus especially affects the lives of people with limited mobility and those responsible for taking care of babies and young children.


Eruv sections
Intro  Definition  Tradition regarding eruv   Communities with eruvin   Controversies   Legal status   Disagreements between Orthodox groups  See also  References  External resources  

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''eruv''::shabbat    Domain::carrying    Jewish::sabbath    Property::public    Private::other    Within::between

{{#invoke:Hatnote|hatnote}} {{ safesubst:#invoke:Unsubst||$N=Globalize |date=__DATE__ |$B= {{#invoke:Message box|ambox}} }}

Preparation of an eruv between Oz Zion and Giv'at Asaf.

An eruv ([ʔeˈʁuv]; Hebrew: עירוב‎{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, "mixture", also transliterated as eiruv or erub, plural: eruvin [ʔeʁuˈvin]) is a ritual enclosure that some communities construct in their neighborhoods as a way to permit Jewish residents or visitors to carry certain objects outside their own homes on Sabbath and Yom Kippur. An eruv accomplishes this by integrating a number of private and public properties into one larger private domain, thereby countermanding restrictions on carrying objects from the private to the public domain on Sabbath and holidays.

The eruv allows these religious Jews to, among other things, carry house keys, tissues, medicines, or babies with them, and use strollers and canes. The presence or absence of an eruv thus especially affects the lives of people with limited mobility and those responsible for taking care of babies and young children.


Eruv sections
Intro  Definition  Tradition regarding eruv   Communities with eruvin   Controversies   Legal status   Disagreements between Orthodox groups  See also  References  External resources  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Definition
<<>>