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Coitus interruptus, also known as the rejected sexual intercourse, withdrawal or pull-out method, is a method of birth control in which a man, during sexual intercourse, withdraws his penis from a woman's vagina prior to orgasm (and ejaculation), and then directs his ejaculate (semen) away from the vagina in an effort to avoid insemination.

This method of contraception, widely used for at least two millennia, is still in use today. This method was used by an estimated 38 million couples worldwide in 1991.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}, which cites:

Population Action International (1991). "A Guide to Methods of Birth Control." Briefing Paper No. 25, Washington, D. C.</ref> Coitus interruptus does not protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs/STDs).<ref name="ineff">{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation

|CitationClass=journal }}</ref>


Coitus interruptus sections
Intro  History   Effects    Advantages    Disadvantages    Prevalence    See also    References   Further reading   External links   

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{{#invoke:Infobox|infobox}}

Coitus interruptus, also known as the rejected sexual intercourse, withdrawal or pull-out method, is a method of birth control in which a man, during sexual intercourse, withdraws his penis from a woman's vagina prior to orgasm (and ejaculation), and then directs his ejaculate (semen) away from the vagina in an effort to avoid insemination.

This method of contraception, widely used for at least two millennia, is still in use today. This method was used by an estimated 38 million couples worldwide in 1991.<ref>{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=journal }}, which cites:

Population Action International (1991). "A Guide to Methods of Birth Control." Briefing Paper No. 25, Washington, D. C.</ref> Coitus interruptus does not protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs/STDs).<ref name="ineff">{{#invoke:Citation/CS1|citation

|CitationClass=journal }}</ref>


Coitus interruptus sections
Intro  History   Effects    Advantages    Disadvantages    Prevalence    See also    References   Further reading   External links   

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: History
<<>>