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The ataaba (Arabic: عتابا‎{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, meaning "plaint" or "dirge", also transliterated 'ataba) is a traditional Arabic musical form sung at weddings or festivals, and sometimes also by people at work.<ref name=Cavendishp996/> Popular in Lebanon, Egypt, Syria, Palestine, and Jordan, it was originally a Bedouin genre, improvised by a solo poet-singer accompanying himself on the rababa.<ref name=Turath>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> As part of the Palestinian folk music tradition, ataabas are generally performed by a vocal soloist, without instrumental accompaniment, who improvises the melody using folk poetry for the verse.<ref name=Kaschlp249>Kaschl, 2003, p. 249.</ref>

Sung unmetered in stanzas comprising four lines, the last word of the first three lines are homonyms, each with a different meaning, creating a pun. In urban settings, the ataaba is often paired with a metric choral refrain called a mījanā.<ref name=Turath/>

The ataaba is also used by rural Palestinian women to express grief or reproach.<ref name=Armitagep324>Armitage et al., 2002, p. 324.</ref> The most common theme of an ataaba is love, though eulogies are also common. Less common themes include moral instruction, and descriptions of nature.<ref name=Cohenp262>Cohen and Katz, 2006, p. 262.</ref>


Ataaba sections
Intro  Structure  Performances  See also  References  Bibliography  

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The ataaba (Arabic: عتابا‎{{#invoke:Category handler|main}}, meaning "plaint" or "dirge", also transliterated 'ataba) is a traditional Arabic musical form sung at weddings or festivals, and sometimes also by people at work.<ref name=Cavendishp996/> Popular in Lebanon, Egypt, Syria, Palestine, and Jordan, it was originally a Bedouin genre, improvised by a solo poet-singer accompanying himself on the rababa.<ref name=Turath>{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> As part of the Palestinian folk music tradition, ataabas are generally performed by a vocal soloist, without instrumental accompaniment, who improvises the melody using folk poetry for the verse.<ref name=Kaschlp249>Kaschl, 2003, p. 249.</ref>

Sung unmetered in stanzas comprising four lines, the last word of the first three lines are homonyms, each with a different meaning, creating a pun. In urban settings, the ataaba is often paired with a metric choral refrain called a mījanā.<ref name=Turath/>

The ataaba is also used by rural Palestinian women to express grief or reproach.<ref name=Armitagep324>Armitage et al., 2002, p. 324.</ref> The most common theme of an ataaba is love, though eulogies are also common. Less common themes include moral instruction, and descriptions of nature.<ref name=Cohenp262>Cohen and Katz, 2006, p. 262.</ref>


Ataaba sections
Intro  Structure  Performances  See also  References  Bibliography  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Structure
<<>>