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The (Himatione sanguinea) is a species of Hawaiian honeycreeper, that is endemic to Hawaii. The bright crimson feathers of the were once used to adorn the (capes), mahiole (helmets), and nā lei hulu (feather leis) of [[Ali'i|ali]] (Hawaiian nobility). Apapane form small flocks when foraging through the canopies of ōhi lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha) trees, drinking nectar from the flowers and simultaneously pollinating them. They never forage on the forest floor. When flowering of ōhi is low and if not part of a flock, will be chased away from flowers by more aggressive competing birds such as the [[ʻAkohekohe|ʻakohekohe]] and [[ʻIʻiwi|]].<ref name="BirdsNorthAm" />

The bird is considered to be an active singer. The males are known for their singing patterns at all times of the day. They have six different calls and about ten different recorded song patterns. The contact call or song of a male is mainly used for mate attraction and breeding. The male who is most aggressive and sings the loudest is the one who wins the females' attention. Once courtship and pair formation has been established, and copulation is complete, both male and female are involved in the nesting process. The male role is important for maintaining courtship feeding during the nest construction and incubation period. The male sings continuously during incubation, while the female does not sing at all. His loud whistling, and chirping sound chases other male birds away from the nesting tree, while he sits on an adjacent perch guarding the nest. The has two distinct flight patterns: straight flight and a circling flight.


ʻApapane sections
Intro  Description  Distribution and habitat  Diet  Breeding  Threats  References  External links  

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Okina::apapane    Species::hawaiian    Birds::malaria    Hawaii::found    Apapane::forests    Category::title

The (Himatione sanguinea) is a species of Hawaiian honeycreeper, that is endemic to Hawaii. The bright crimson feathers of the were once used to adorn the (capes), mahiole (helmets), and nā lei hulu (feather leis) of [[Ali'i|ali]] (Hawaiian nobility). Apapane form small flocks when foraging through the canopies of ōhi lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha) trees, drinking nectar from the flowers and simultaneously pollinating them. They never forage on the forest floor. When flowering of ōhi is low and if not part of a flock, will be chased away from flowers by more aggressive competing birds such as the [[ʻAkohekohe|ʻakohekohe]] and [[ʻIʻiwi|]].<ref name="BirdsNorthAm" />

The bird is considered to be an active singer. The males are known for their singing patterns at all times of the day. They have six different calls and about ten different recorded song patterns. The contact call or song of a male is mainly used for mate attraction and breeding. The male who is most aggressive and sings the loudest is the one who wins the females' attention. Once courtship and pair formation has been established, and copulation is complete, both male and female are involved in the nesting process. The male role is important for maintaining courtship feeding during the nest construction and incubation period. The male sings continuously during incubation, while the female does not sing at all. His loud whistling, and chirping sound chases other male birds away from the nesting tree, while he sits on an adjacent perch guarding the nest. The has two distinct flight patterns: straight flight and a circling flight.


ʻApapane sections
Intro  Description  Distribution and habitat  Diet  Breeding  Threats  References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Description
<<>>