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The (Palmeria dolei) or crested honeycreeper is a species of Hawaiian honeycreeper. It is endemic to the island of Maui in [[Hawaii|Hawai]]. Its natural habitat is wet forests dominated by koa (Acacia koa) and ōhi lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha) on the windward side of Haleakalā at elevations of {{safesubst:#invoke:convert|convert}}. It is the largest honeycreeper on the island at {{safesubst:#invoke:convert|convert}} in length.<ref name="ForestBirds">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> The adults are a glossy black with whitish feathers and stripes going down its side. The underparts are whitish black while the top has orange feathers sticking from wings. The feathers behind the eyes are a reddish color, and have a stream of cream colored feathers coming from the eyes. One of the things that most people recognize about this bird is its whitish gold colored feather crest on its head. The younger birds are brownish black and they do not have the orangish feathers of the parents. The legs and bills are a blackish color. It has a variety of songs. The most well known of the calls is a pair of whee-o, whee-o, being repeated over and over again. Also another well known song is a descending thrill which is done about five seconds apart. It songs include a low chuckling sound, tjook, tjook, chouroup or a rarer song, hur-hur-hur-gluk-gluk-gluk. During a search for the species in the east Maui forests, there were a record of 415 observations over an area of {{safesubst:#invoke:convert|convert}} and at elevations from {{safesubst:#invoke:convert|convert}} above sea level. It has been estimated that there are a total of 3,800 left on Maui in two populations separated by the Ko Gap.


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Okina::species    Birds::feathers    Category::which    Hawaii::forests    Hawaiian::convert    Island::lehua''

The (Palmeria dolei) or crested honeycreeper is a species of Hawaiian honeycreeper. It is endemic to the island of Maui in [[Hawaii|Hawai]]. Its natural habitat is wet forests dominated by koa (Acacia koa) and ōhi lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha) on the windward side of Haleakalā at elevations of {{safesubst:#invoke:convert|convert}}. It is the largest honeycreeper on the island at {{safesubst:#invoke:convert|convert}} in length.<ref name="ForestBirds">{{#invoke:citation/CS1|citation |CitationClass=web }}</ref> The adults are a glossy black with whitish feathers and stripes going down its side. The underparts are whitish black while the top has orange feathers sticking from wings. The feathers behind the eyes are a reddish color, and have a stream of cream colored feathers coming from the eyes. One of the things that most people recognize about this bird is its whitish gold colored feather crest on its head. The younger birds are brownish black and they do not have the orangish feathers of the parents. The legs and bills are a blackish color. It has a variety of songs. The most well known of the calls is a pair of whee-o, whee-o, being repeated over and over again. Also another well known song is a descending thrill which is done about five seconds apart. It songs include a low chuckling sound, tjook, tjook, chouroup or a rarer song, hur-hur-hur-gluk-gluk-gluk. During a search for the species in the east Maui forests, there were a record of 415 observations over an area of {{safesubst:#invoke:convert|convert}} and at elevations from {{safesubst:#invoke:convert|convert}} above sea level. It has been estimated that there are a total of 3,800 left on Maui in two populations separated by the Ko Gap.


ʻAkohekohe sections
Intro   Diet    Threats    Conservation   References  External links  

PREVIOUS: IntroNEXT: Diet
<<>>